Bubba's Bar 'n' Grill

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a gilded flicker... what's it like?
I like when the Jays swoop in sometimes. Variety is the spice of life Smile
I have several feeders and suet cake holders in my yard. One of my feeders is less than ten feet from the large window where I have a futon. There is a lot of activity there. Right now the regulars include chipping sparrows, titmice, black-capped chickadees, cardinals, juncos, purple finches, and mourning doves. (The doves prefer to feed on the ground under the feeder.) I also have a pair of red-bellied woodpeckers that drop by for a snack several times a day as well as downy and hairy woodpeckers. The latter two seem to find what they need in the branches of the water oak where the feeder hangs. Carolina wrens live under our home (We are in a flood zone and have to live eight feet off the ground.) and frequent the suet cakes. I really need to invest in a good camera. The point-and-shoot one I have just cannot zoom in close enough to get good shots. We watched a male cardinal do his courting dance for a seemingly uninterested female the other day. He stretched his wings out one at a time and stroked the insides of them with his feet. It was quite a show, but the female was not fooled by the unusually mild weather. She knows the time is not right. Two weeks ago we were surprised by several wild turkey hens in the partially cleared woods behind the yard. And yes, there are squirrels. I have resigned to the fact that they are going to get their share of the buffet. Live and let live. Thankfully the water oak is a very fertile tree and provides them with enough acorns to at least partially divert them from the sunflower seeds. Words cannot express the joy I get from watching them. I reflect on the days when I was a young boy when my mother and I would watch the birds in our feeder and note "our yard" next to the descriptions and pictures in our field guide. Mental note to myself to check the attic for that book when I visit her next. I view my bird seed expense as my tithe in life and a much better investment than placing it in a collection plate.
[quote='Scythe Matters' pid='28794' dateline='1321833848']
Beautiful plumage! Wink


[Image: dsc_4076.jpg]

VU--This is a flicker from a previous post. The ones we have here are not nearly as yellow.
(02-09-2012 04:36 PM)RaoulDuke Wrote: [ -> ]I have several feeders and suet cake holders in my yard. One of my feeders is less than ten feet from the large window where I have a futon. There is a lot of activity there. Right now the regulars include chipping sparrows, titmice, black-capped chickadees, cardinals, juncos, purple finches, and mourning doves. (The doves prefer to feed on the ground under the feeder.) I also have a pair of red-bellied woodpeckers that drop by for a snack several times a day as well as downy and hairy woodpeckers. The latter two seem to find what they need in the branches of the water oak where the feeder hangs. Carolina wrens live under our home (We are in a flood zone and have to live eight feet off the ground.) and frequent the suet cakes. I really need to invest in a good camera. The point-and-shoot one I have just cannot zoom in close enough to get good shots. We watched a male cardinal do his courting dance for a seemingly uninterested female the other day. He stretched his wings out one at a time and stroked the insides of them with his feet. It was quite a show, but the female was not fooled by the unusually mild weather. She knows the time is not right. Two weeks ago we were surprised by several wild turkey hens in the partially cleared woods behind the yard. And yes, there are squirrels. I have resigned to the fact that they are going to get their share of the buffet. Live and let live. Thankfully the water oak is a very fertile tree and provides them with enough acorns to at least partially divert them from the sunflower seeds. Words cannot express the joy I get from watching them. I reflect on the days when I was a young boy when my mother and I would watch the birds in our feeder and note "our yard" next to the descriptions and pictures in our field guide. Mental note to myself to check the attic for that book when I visit her next. I view my bird seed expense as my tithe in life and a much better investment than placing it in a collection plate.

Sounds like you have a feeding station like Bubba's. Take some pics or video - I'd love to see all the birds Big Grin
(02-09-2012 04:36 PM)RaoulDuke Wrote: [ -> ]I have several feeders and suet cake holders in my yard. One of my feeders is less than ten feet from the large window where I have a futon. There is a lot of activity there. Right now the regulars include chipping sparrows, titmice, black-capped chickadees, cardinals, juncos, purple finches, and mourning doves. (The doves prefer to feed on the ground under the feeder.) I also have a pair of red-bellied woodpeckers that drop by for a snack several times a day as well as downy and hairy woodpeckers. The latter two seem to find what they need in the branches of the water oak where the feeder hangs. Carolina wrens live under our home (We are in a flood zone and have to live eight feet off the ground.) and frequent the suet cakes. I really need to invest in a good camera. The point-and-shoot one I have just cannot zoom in close enough to get good shots. We watched a male cardinal do his courting dance for a seemingly uninterested female the other day. He stretched his wings out one at a time and stroked the insides of them with his feet. It was quite a show, but the female was not fooled by the unusually mild weather. She knows the time is not right. Two weeks ago we were surprised by several wild turkey hens in the partially cleared woods behind the yard. And yes, there are squirrels. I have resigned to the fact that they are going to get their share of the buffet. Live and let live. Thankfully the water oak is a very fertile tree and provides them with enough acorns to at least partially divert them from the sunflower seeds. Words cannot express the joy I get from watching them. I reflect on the days when I was a young boy when my mother and I would watch the birds in our feeder and note "our yard" next to the descriptions and pictures in our field guide. Mental note to myself to check the attic for that book when I visit her next. I view my bird seed expense as my tithe in life and a much better investment than placing it in a collection plate.

I really enjoyed reading this post Raoul! I could picture it clearly in my mind's eye.

Sometimes I wonder if I spend too much feeding birds when there are some people without enough food but you're right. It's my offering to nature! It doesn't hurt to throw something in the plate for our fellow man so I feed them too!
(02-09-2012 07:43 PM)Gungawoman Wrote: [ -> ][quote='Scythe Matters' pid='28794' dateline='1321833848']
Beautiful plumage! Wink


[Image: dsc_4076.jpg]

VU--This is a flicker from a previous post. The ones we have here are not nearly as yellow.

Yes, I remember this. It reminds me of the woodpecker that visits once in a while. The name throws me off. Big Grin
I really enjoyed reading this post Raoul! I could picture it clearly in my mind's eye.

Sometimes I wonder if I spend too much feeding birds when there are some people without enough food but you're right. It's my offering to nature! It doesn't hurt to throw something in the plate for our fellow man so I feed them too!

Thanks! We regularly help the local shelter with donations and volunteering at my job. I live in a very rural area and never see the people who need assistance, but all I have to do is drive 20 miles to Myrtle Beach and see the real world. Right in the middle of the hustle and bustle of a large resort city resides a rather large homeless population. They sleep in the woods just a few hundred yards from restaurants that offer very expensive items on their menus. It annoys me that people drop large sums of money on meals there and are oblivious to the needy people sleeping just down the street. Most of the clientele are tourists, though, and I am sure every effort is exhausted to keep this matter under the table so to speak. With unusually cold weather coming for the next few days (nighttime temps in the low 20s F) extra shelter space will be opened up. Bubba was right in "Armor and Sword" by writing some people's heaven is "a refuge for the coming night".
Had an amazing encounter last night, well, around 4:00 this a.m., when I was awoken by the sound of male and female Great Horned Owls calling to each other right outside our bedroom window! I quickly threw on my coat and boots, grabbed my camera and the closest flashlight I could find and snuck out the door. They were both in a small section of tall evergreens just along the cart path on the golf course that we live on and continued actively calling for at least 20 minutes! I'm sure they heard/saw me, because the ground was frozen and crunchy, but, remembering VU's experience with the owl swooping down on him a few weeks ago (that was you Vincent, correct?) I stood as close to another tree as possible thinking it would provide at least a little bit of a deterrent!

I was hoping the moon would be bright enough to at least catch a glimpse of their silhouettes (sp?), but it was filtered by a thin layer of clouds, and my flashlight wasn't strong enough either, so I just enjoyed listening to them, the male then the female, her voice just an octave or so higher than his. I did manage to get a little bit of audio, but a light snow was falling and I didn't want my camera to get too wet.

Eventually I got greedy and moved-in a little closer, at which point they must have silently taken-off. After a few minutes of silence, I finally heard them again off in the distance. How they both took off without making even the slightest sound is amazing to me!

Hope to hear them again sometime soon...next time, I'll be better prepared with a proper flashlight (and red cellophane), and maybe even the new pair of binoculars with night vision that I've been eyeing the past few days. This event may have pushed me right over into the buy-now category!!!
(09-28-2010 07:50 PM)VincentUlyssis Wrote: [ -> ]I've always loved watching our winged pals.

What have you seen?

[attachment=461]
I broke out my camera (can't remember what brand of cereal it was bagged as a prize in), and I am trying to get some decent bird shots. If the order comes up correctly as I see it the first is a female cardinal. The second is a group of goldfinches. The third is a male cardinal with a male purple finch and a sparrow to his left. The fourth is a group of chipping sparrows.
(02-11-2012 01:37 PM)Markus Awreallyus Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-28-2010 07:50 PM)VincentUlyssis Wrote: [ -> ]I've always loved watching our winged pals.

What have you seen?

Is that a Black Swallowtail? I'm not sure. The blue throws me off. That is beautiful where did you see it? In what part of the world are you?

Deb, I'd love to see an owl. That wasn't me unfortunately but your experience sounds very cool.
(02-12-2012 11:02 AM)RaoulDuke Wrote: [ -> ]I broke out my camera (can't remember what brand of cereal it was bagged as a prize in), and I am trying to get some decent bird shots. If the order comes up correctly as I see it the first is a female cardinal. The second is a group of goldfinches. The third is a male cardinal with a male purple finch and a sparrow to his left. The fourth is a group of chipping sparrows.

I like, I like. What part of the country are you in?
Oh, and how do you get pics with files small enough to post? I have trouble with this.
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