Bubba's Bar 'n' Grill

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For the Porterhouse I am preparing, I chose Donum Carneros Estate Grown Pinot Noir 2006. I love the body and fruitful hints in this wine.

I find the wonderful oak tones and fruity depth to fully compliment a well seasoned cut of beef.
(04-20-2010 07:34 PM)Synthetic Wrote: [ -> ]For the Porterhouse I am preparing, I chose Donum Carneros Estate Grown Pinot Noir 2006. I love the body and fruitful hints in this wine.

I find the wonderful oak tones and fruity depth to fully compliment a well seasoned cut of beef.

I've been a wine lover for years and recently decided to make my own Cabernet in Napa. It's still fruity, but I think the boldness of cab stands up better to a rich steak.
Mmmm, I love wine. I was pleased to see in NEP's intro to this lovely site that he had Marques de Riscal Rioja on his table. That is a lovely wine right now.

Good luck to you, wineguy, in your endeavors in Napa from another wine lover who lives in San Francisco.
I'm no sommelier, but a very good pairing for my tastebuds is a medium rare filet mignon alongside the (francis ford) Coppola Claret. The bottle is easy to find in stores. Just look for the golden "netting" around the bottle.

On a side note, did you know that Coppola's son is Nicholas Cage, who starred in Ghost Rider?
(04-29-2010 07:29 AM)ePhilosopher9 Wrote: [ -> ]I'm no sommelier, but a very good pairing for my tastebuds is a medium rare filet mignon alongside the (francis ford) Coppola Claret. The bottle is easy to find in stores. Just look for the golden "netting" around the bottle.

On a side note, did you know that Coppola's son is Nicholas Cage, who starred in Ghost Rider?

I have had that wine and especially for the price it is perfect.

And yes - Nick Cage is Francis' son... he purposely used the Cage name to ensure he didn't get treated differently when starting out...

The last time I had that wine was with lamb shank and it complimented it well...
If you had $25 to spend and only one wine to chose...no food to accompany it, just for drinking...what would be your choice?
(04-29-2010 09:09 AM)Brutus Wrote: [ -> ]If you had $25 to spend and only one wine to chose...no food to accompany it, just for drinking...what would be your choice?
Oddly enough I had a really nice wine last night that fit that bill EXACTLY. I am not usually a fan of Burgundy reds but our hotel has what they call "Wednesday Wine-down" where they feature 2 whites and 2 reds and slice the bottle price in half. Each week the sommelier selects an Old World and New World of each variety and this weeks Old World Red was Brouilly, Burgundy, France, Chateau De La Chaize, 2006. Our sommelier knows my taste in wine and insisted that I sample this red, as he said "Bill, with your taste in red wines, I know this will be a pleasant drinking wine for you, as it has a very moderate body and interesting, yet not overpowering flavor and tones." He was SPOT ON as it was a wonderful medium body wine. So much so that I wound up having 2 bottles (I live next door to The Alluvian Hotel, so safety was no concern).

I highly recommend that wine! I just ordered a case of it this morning and am looking forward to pairing it with some red sauce mussels and pasta, but it stood perfectly on its own without food.

I would say that for $25 that was the best 'bang for the buck' that I have had in years!
I'll see if I can track it down in Cowfart (not known for its oenological variety). Sounds like my type of wine too. So many good wines aren't fit for drinking young and by the time they mature they are off the chart price wise. I think that is why you see people gravitating to California wines for example. They are more immediately consumable. That and a cellar and the patience of Job.
(04-29-2010 09:28 AM)Brutus Wrote: [ -> ]I'll see if I can track it down in Cowfart (not known for its oenological variety). Sounds like my type of wine too. So many good wines aren't fit for drinking young and by the time they mature they are off the chart price wise. I think that is why you see people gravitating to California wines for example. They are more immediately consumable. That and a cellar and the patience of Job.

It is oddly coincidental that you posted that question the morning after I discovered such a wonderful wine... In fact I had intended on starting a thread about the Chateau De La Chaize, 2006 to recommend it.

Another wine that I simply adore (since you didn't specify white or red in your question) is J.J. Prum Riesling Kabinett 2007. I was stationed in Germany while in the military and rented my house from a winemaker and this was his favorite Riesling. It stands alone and is such a joy to drink by itself. I also do love it with fish or seafood. I currently obtain this by the case for about $24/bottle.
If I had to I would vote for Riesling to be the most misunderstood wine by North Americans. I guess it's because they've been indoctrinated into believing that what passes for "Riesling" locally, in any way resembles what's available in Germany and Austria primarily. They are not alike in any way and a good Riesling can cost the farm but deals can be found. But a good Condrieu might put up a good fight for consideration?
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