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Every forum I'm on, there's at least a few riders...

I haven't been on the street for a few years now. But, I ride mostly race tracks and motocross now. I do miss the occasional jaunt to one of the many restaurants in the area though.


Anyone else ride?
(04-22-2010 09:12 AM)ForceTen Wrote: [ -> ]Every forum I'm on, there's at least a few riders...

I haven't been on the street for a few years now. But, I ride mostly race tracks and motocross now. I do miss the occasional jaunt to one of the many restaurants in the area though.


Anyone else ride?

Yes. I ride too. Not as much as I'd like, but w all know how that goes. It's just so hard to get in all of our interests, isn't it? Riding, traveling, cooking, golf, working out, etc. But I always plan to get to the Top 'O the Rockies rally in Paonia, CO every July. Always a good time.
I ride as well, although with a penchant for older bikes I probably work on them as much as I ride them. I only got into motorcycling a few years ago, but I really enjoy it. Northern California has great roads and weather, and I hope this summer to spend a lot more time in the saddle.
Very cool. I'm here in MN so there's a lot of plains and flat grounds. But, along the rivers and some areas there's some decent roads. The Wisconsin Alphabets are about 90 minutes from me which are considered to be in the top 5 for US motorcycling locations.

GROWLR, I hear ya on the lack of time with interests. Far too many things to do and not enough hours in the day to do it all.
2002 Suzuki Volusia

I've been riding about 2 years now. Likewise, I don't get out there too much, mainly just commuting to work and back, but I'm glad I'm developing this skill for the future.

I'm in North Carolina only about an hour from the Blue Ridge Parkway, so I can't say I don't have places to ride...just need more time!

Darren
If you're in North Carolina, you've got another great place to ride: US129 and surrounding areas which looks like it's in the area.


So many great places to ride. My goal is to hit up as many tracks as I can.
(04-22-2010 03:08 PM)ForceTen Wrote: [ -> ]If you're in North Carolina, you've got another great place to ride: US129 and surrounding areas which looks like it's in the area.


So many great places to ride. My goal is to hit up as many tracks as I can.

Ah..Deals Gap and the Tail of the Dragon! Being a very inexperienced rider and the fact that my bike was not designed for it, I'll stay clear from that area for awhile. I believe Neil spoke about this either in one of his last books or perhaps a news update. I definitely don't want to be part of the problem. For some reason, riding in large groups hasn't enticed me to join one of them yet. That place just seems like it would be crowded and uncomfortable.
I know this thread is intended to be about motorcycling, but I thought it would be okay to mention another form of riding. Why yes I like to “ride”… a bicycle that is. I know not as exciting as motorcycling, but still fun and a good form of exercise, and sometimes you can ride where a motorcycle cannot. Since I ride mostly for recreation and enjoyment, I prefer to do it off the street away from all the noisy cars and trucks. Around here where I live in the Midwest, the best places to ride are bike trails that have been converted from old railroad grades. These preserved corridors make excellent bicycle trails, often going through scenic areas you can never see from a road. Since they were originally made for trains, hills are also kept to a minimum, grades usually being gradual which means easier pedaling. The only traffic to deal with are other bikes, and the occasional road intersection, but even those are often ridden over on a bridge. The trails near my house take me through cool woods, farmers fields, and along meandering rivers. Instead of aggressive, honking drivers, there is only the friendly nod from other passing cyclists. It truly is the best way to ride (but sorry no motorized vehicles allowed).

My favorite trail to ride, when I can get up there, is one in Wisconsin called the Elroy-Sparta bike trail. This railtrail is unique in that it has three good size rock tunnels through the hills. It is kind of like a work, then reward type ride. There is a pretty steep grade (as far as railroads go) leading up to each tunnel, so you are straining as you work your way up, steady for several miles. Lets say it’s a warm day too, so you are really hot when you get to the top. You enter the tunnel and you are rewarded with a rush of cool air, natural air conditioning from within the hill. One of the tunnels is close to a mile long, when you get inside the other end looks like a keyhole of light in the distance. You hear running water as it drips down the tunnel walls, and sounds echo all around in a natural, eerie reverb. When you exit the tunnel it is all downhill for several miles into the next valley, so you can coast and take it easy, until its time to start climbing again to the next tunnel. Not to mention the nice scenery of farmlands and woods this all passes through in central Wisconsin, lots of fun that’s for sure.

-Rey
(04-23-2010 01:57 PM)Rey Wrote: [ -> ]I know this thread is intended to be about motorcycling, but I thought it would be okay to mention another form of riding. Why yes I like to “ride”… a bicycle that is. I know not as exciting as motorcycling, but still fun and a good form of exercise, and sometimes you can ride where a motorcycle cannot. Since I ride mostly for recreation and enjoyment, I prefer to do it off the street away from all the noisy cars and trucks. Around here where I live in the Midwest, the best places to ride are bike trails that have been converted from old railroad grades. These preserved corridors make excellent bicycle trails, often going through scenic areas you can never see from a road. Since they were originally made for trains, hills are also kept to a minimum, grades usually being gradual which means easier pedaling. The only traffic to deal with are other bikes, and the occasional road intersection, but even those are often ridden over on a bridge. The trails near my house take me through cool woods, farmers fields, and along meandering rivers. Instead of aggressive, honking drivers, there is only the friendly nod from other passing cyclists. It truly is the best way to ride (but sorry no motorized vehicles allowed).

My favorite trail to ride, when I can get up there, is one in Wisconsin called the Elroy-Sparta bike trail. This railtrail is unique in that it has three good size rock tunnels through the hills. It is kind of like a work, then reward type ride. There is a pretty steep grade (as far as railroads go) leading up to each tunnel, so you are straining as you work your way up, steady for several miles. Lets say it’s a warm day too, so you are really hot when you get to the top. You enter the tunnel and you are rewarded with a rush of cool air, natural air conditioning from within the hill. One of the tunnels is close to a mile long, when you get inside the other end looks like a keyhole of light in the distance. You hear running water as it drips down the tunnel walls, and sounds echo all around in a natural, eerie reverb. When you exit the tunnel it is all downhill for several miles into the next valley, so you can coast and take it easy, until its time to start climbing again to the next tunnel. Not to mention the nice scenery of farmlands and woods this all passes through in central Wisconsin, lots of fun that’s for sure.

-Rey
Well told. I have memories of living in Quebec near Lac St. Brutus every summer for about 10 years. It has the same thing happening there where they've ripped up the old train tracks and turned them into bike paths in the summer and cross country ski trails in the winter. And because of the strain on the old train engines that ran those routes there is nothing more than a 10% rise or fall in elevation. In the area I lived in Quebec in the Laurentian Mountains around St. Sauveur there were 1000s of kilometeres of trails. Everyday, all summer long, you could ride something new. It was great. Another contrast is the summer I spent in Keene Valley, NY. There were only 3 ways to cycle out of the valley and everyone of them involved climbing the mountains to escape. I never did although I came close. Most rides (no mountain bike with a gazillion gears, just my faithful Trek with 12 in those days) I'd climb and climb 'till the bike slowly and agonizingly came to a stop....Then, looking carefully for trafic that wanted to kill me, I'd do a U and head back down...30 and then 40 miles an hour....Yikes! Don't do that at home kids.
Well, I was going to kind of ask that in contents of my thank you note to the admin's (Brutus/Bubba) for the invite to join the forum. THANK YOU for the invite! Happy to be here!

Yes I ride! You might call it multiple bike disorder. Living in The Great State of Tennessee we have many wonderful places to ride and eat. If you are in the Middle Tennessee area and want good riding roads or places to eat, I would be happy to send some suggestions. Just p/m me and I'll try and set you on the right corse or road. Riding for about 28 years now and have no intention of quitting.

Not much of a cook other than the Webber grill and a omlet now and then. Leave the rest up to my wonerful wife. Don't mess with a good thing, right.

Thanks again guys.
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