Bubba's Bar 'n' Grill
Photography - Printable Version

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RE: Photography - Bageleth - 03-19-2011 10:11 AM

Very good pic Rey.........I love black & whites


RE: Photography - Boomer - 03-19-2011 11:36 AM

Love the BW work - because the focus isnt the colors - its the subject. Simplifies the image...for me anyways.


RE: Photography - Rey - 03-21-2011 11:01 AM

Yes, I like black and white, but I also like color too, depending on the subject. I think black and white looks good on subjects that are old, almost as if the photo came from another time. I also like the mood a black and white photo can present. There is just something about the absence of color, combined with the grainy look of the film, that can create a whole feeling or mood. I often notice this when looking at photos of the past. It almost seems like history has no color. Do you think of nice bright colors when you think about the depression era of the 1930’s? No, in those hard times, when looking at photos now, it seems that world was a colorless and depressing place. But if you find those rare color photos from that time, you will see of course, the colors were all there. Even some of the clothing styles of the time were quite colorful. Here is link that I found to some color photographs of the era. It is amazing to see this time in color:

http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2010/07/26/captured-america-in-color-from-1939-1943/2363/

But, back to black and white. When I took the photography class, all those many years ago, of course we used real film. There were no digital cameras yet. To keep it easier to learn, it was all in black and white too. I remember mixing all the chemical potions together and pouring them in the trays. Putting the film on the enlarger and exposing the photographic paper for just the right number of seconds. Rocking the tray back and forth with your paper in there and watching the image magically appear. It was quite a task just to get the end result, a picture. The moody grainy effect I mentioned above was also much more apparent with real film, than a digital photo today.

I remember when the first digital images appeared. There at the school, in the mid 80's, there was a digital image of Einstein on the old Apple II+ computer. The monitor was that green monochrome, the resolution I think 279 pixels across. It did look like him though, with a little imagination. But digital photography is here to stay now I think, and I like it alright, it is a lot easier to work with. But maybe a little more sterile? My black and white photo a few posts back has none of the film induced moodiness I have been talking about. I know you can add some with programs like photoshop, but then it becomes a bit more, I don't know, artificial?

"Can all this machinery making modern...", Ha, you get the idea.

-Rey


RE: Photography - NamoNamo - 03-28-2011 12:01 PM

I like the colours on the picture of the flowers on the balcony, nice and subtle. And I really like the one trough the glass (http://www.flickr.com/photos/30255666@N08/5529636208/) it works really well in b/w Smile The focus on the glass revels the little imperfections in it and blurs the street outside nicely.
Would like to see it "straightened" though and that goes for a lot of pictures Tongue Remember you horizon level, it usually looks better straight unless you are trying for e certain effect Smile Can be fixed in photoshop, but that crops the picture a bit, so its best to line it up in the first place

(03-15-2011 10:04 AM)Bageleth Wrote:  Ok, here are a few links to the pics that I took in Seattle last August. We were there for a certain group of performers who were in the area the night before.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30255666@N08/5529038507/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30255666@N08/5529629140/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30255666@N08/5529043445/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30255666@N08/5529633724/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30255666@N08/5529636208/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30255666@N08/5529638470/

Thanks for posting that link, made me realise I haven't really seen color images from that time before! It is like you said, it gives color to the history ^^ The picture of the Shasta dam under construction is crazy...

(03-21-2011 11:01 AM)Rey Wrote:  Yes, I like black and white, but I also like color too, depending on the subject. I think black and white looks good on subjects that are old, almost as if the photo came from another time. I also like the mood a black and white photo can present. There is just something about the absence of color, combined with the grainy look of the film, that can create a whole feeling or mood. I often notice this when looking at photos of the past. It almost seems like history has no color. Do you think of nice bright colors when you think about the depression era of the 1930’s? No, in those hard times, when looking at photos now, it seems that world was a colorless and depressing place. But if you find those rare color photos from that time, you will see of course, the colors were all there. Even some of the clothing styles of the time were quite colorful. Here is link that I found to some color photographs of the era. It is amazing to see this time in color:

http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2010/07/26/captured-america-in-color-from-1939-1943/2363/

But, back to black and white. When I took the photography class, all those many years ago, of course we used real film. There were no digital cameras yet. To keep it easier to learn, it was all in black and white too. I remember mixing all the chemical potions together and pouring them in the trays. Putting the film on the enlarger and exposing the photographic paper for just the right number of seconds. Rocking the tray back and forth with your paper in there and watching the image magically appear. It was quite a task just to get the end result, a picture. The moody grainy effect I mentioned above was also much more apparent with real film, than a digital photo today.

I remember when the first digital images appeared. There at the school, in the mid 80's, there was a digital image of Einstein on the old Apple II+ computer. The monitor was that green monochrome, the resolution I think 279 pixels across. It did look like him though, with a little imagination. But digital photography is here to stay now I think, and I like it alright, it is a lot easier to work with. But maybe a little more sterile? My black and white photo a few posts back has none of the film induced moodiness I have been talking about. I know you can add some with programs like photoshop, but then it becomes a bit more, I don't know, artificial?

"Can all this machinery making modern...", Ha, you get the idea.

-Rey



RE: Photography - Bageleth - 03-28-2011 12:25 PM

(03-28-2011 12:01 PM)NamoNamo Wrote:  I like the colours on the picture of the flowers on the balcony, nice and subtle. And I really like the one trough the glass (http://www.flickr.com/photos/30255666@N08/5529636208/) it works really well in b/w Smile The focus on the glass revels the little imperfections in it and blurs the street outside nicely.
Would like to see it "straightened" though and that goes for a lot of pictures Tongue Remember you horizon level, it usually looks better straight unless you are trying for e certain effect Smile Can be fixed in photoshop, but that crops the picture a bit, so its best to line it up in the first place

(03-15-2011 10:04 AM)Bageleth Wrote:  Ok, here are a few links to the pics that I took in Seattle last August. We were there for a certain group of performers who were in the area the night before.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30255666@N08/5529038507/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30255666@N08/5529629140/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30255666@N08/5529043445/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30255666@N08/5529633724/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30255666@N08/5529636208/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/30255666@N08/5529638470/

Thanks for posting that link, made me realise I haven't really seen color images from that time before! It is like you said, it gives color to the history ^^ The picture of the Shasta dam under construction is crazy...

(03-21-2011 11:01 AM)Rey Wrote:  Yes, I like black and white, but I also like color too, depending on the subject. I think black and white looks good on subjects that are old, almost as if the photo came from another time. I also like the mood a black and white photo can present. There is just something about the absence of color, combined with the grainy look of the film, that can create a whole feeling or mood. I often notice this when looking at photos of the past. It almost seems like history has no color. Do you think of nice bright colors when you think about the depression era of the 1930’s? No, in those hard times, when looking at photos now, it seems that world was a colorless and depressing place. But if you find those rare color photos from that time, you will see of course, the colors were all there. Even some of the clothing styles of the time were quite colorful. Here is link that I found to some color photographs of the era. It is amazing to see this time in color:

http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2010/07/26/captured-america-in-color-from-1939-1943/2363/

But, back to black and white. When I took the photography class, all those many years ago, of course we used real film. There were no digital cameras yet. To keep it easier to learn, it was all in black and white too. I remember mixing all the chemical potions together and pouring them in the trays. Putting the film on the enlarger and exposing the photographic paper for just the right number of seconds. Rocking the tray back and forth with your paper in there and watching the image magically appear. It was quite a task just to get the end result, a picture. The moody grainy effect I mentioned above was also much more apparent with real film, than a digital photo today.

I remember when the first digital images appeared. There at the school, in the mid 80's, there was a digital image of Einstein on the old Apple II+ computer. The monitor was that green monochrome, the resolution I think 279 pixels across. It did look like him though, with a little imagination. But digital photography is here to stay now I think, and I like it alright, it is a lot easier to work with. But maybe a little more sterile? My black and white photo a few posts back has none of the film induced moodiness I have been talking about. I know you can add some with programs like photoshop, but then it becomes a bit more, I don't know, artificial?

"Can all this machinery making modern...", Ha, you get the idea.

-Rey

I was serving as my own "tripod"


RE: Photography - NamoNamo - 03-28-2011 12:48 PM

(seems if I click reply on posts they kind of stack and it seems a bit messy..trying this instead..)

If you don't mind it, I try to add some constructive criticism to my comments, it's a little bit for my own sake cause I need to practice picture analysis for my uni course Smile So please don't get offended or think that I think that I'm some kind of expert or anything!

@Mufasa: There's some lovely images in that set, they are a bit all over the place, like bits from someones life Smile One image really stands out: The one called Venus is amazing! You should repost in bigger size on here.

@Rey: Nice and sharp skyline Smile Would maybe have tilted it upwards a bit to avoid the pavement in the foreground?
The one of the train tracks makes me feel dizzy! Cool!
Lovely shadows and texture in the black and white one

@Boomer: The black and white image is lovely, I like how when looking at it you start at the foreground the you sort of travel into the background, Its really comfortable to look at Smile
The snow on the trees is beautiful, and its a good job to properly expose a snow scene.
I would love to go see that church, amazing building. Picture needs a little "tilting" but I like how its sort of "facing" the sun with its entrance
Did you use a tripod for the indoor ones? Light seems really good

@nettiesaur: What a cutie! And not bad for a camera phone, lovely soft colours aswell adds to the mood, warm inside/cold outside, the blurryness of the pic sort of adds to the soft mood I think


RE: Photography - Boomer - 03-28-2011 01:52 PM

(03-28-2011 12:48 PM)NamoNamo Wrote:  (seems if I click reply on posts they kind of stack and it seems a bit messy..trying this instead..)

If you don't mind it, I try to add some constructive criticism to my comments, it's a little bit for my own sake cause I need to practice picture analysis for my uni course Smile So please don't get offended or think that I think that I'm some kind of expert or anything!


@Boomer: The black and white image is lovely, I like how when looking at it you start at the foreground the you sort of travel into the background, Its really comfortable to look at Smile
The snow on the trees is beautiful, and its a good job to properly expose a snow scene.
I would love to go see that church, amazing building. Picture needs a little "tilting" but I like how its sort of "facing" the sun with its entrance
Did you use a tripod for the indoor ones? Light seems really good


Hey thanks! I need all the constructive criticism I can get. Unfortunately I am still learning, and you end up going thru a ton of frames for maybe one or two decent ones. The church images - well, if I had the time I would have used a tripod, but I was in a bit of a hurry. Next time I go up I want to take the tripod to get some better shots. That church is simply amazing!

The view of the Mississippi River Valley is one of several shots I have taken when over there on my Harley. There is a viewpoint from which you can observe the eagles nesting. One of my shots, a color image, actually made the cover of the "office" newsletter, but thats another story.

To tell you the truth I am trying to steepen my learning curve. I used to take pictures thru a periscope - and those are so highly classified even I have to ask permission to see them. This digital thing has me for a loop. I do have a Nikon N75 film camera that I am using for BW images, but those you have to be really selective about. So if you have any tips tricks post away! I can use all the help I can get!


RE: Photography - NWoBHM - 03-28-2011 05:05 PM

Quote:That church is simply amazing!

I never mentioned Boomer, I love Church`s, they are so peaceful places, with some of the best architecture, and I mistakenly thought we had the lead on this, but got to say, your Church looked fantastic mate!


RE: Photography - Boomer - 03-28-2011 07:15 PM

(03-28-2011 05:05 PM)NWoBHM Wrote:  
Quote:That church is simply amazing!

I never mentioned Boomer, I love Church`s, they are so peaceful places, with some of the best architecture, and I mistakenly thought we had the lead on this, but got to say, your Church looked fantastic mate!

I have been in some church's that just bugged me to no end. And then I have been in churches where they had to drag me out....this was one of those churches. This is one of the most magnificent churches I have been to here in the States. I have been to St. Patricks in Boston, a couple of ones in London, more than a fair share in Chicago...St Patricks Cathedral I think was one, but this one was just so impeccable. I was actually surprised they let me in with my camera, but when I spoke to one of the priests there - they actually encourage visitors to come in and take pictures as long as they are quiet about it. Next trip up I want to get some of their pipe organ - it was under some serious restoration when we were there.

There are several churches around the Minneapolis St Paul area. I'll be armed with my camera!!!


RE: Photography - Nettie - 03-28-2011 07:29 PM

(03-28-2011 07:15 PM)boomer Wrote:  
(03-28-2011 05:05 PM)NWoBHM Wrote:  
Quote:That church is simply amazing!

I never mentioned Boomer, I love Church`s, they are so peaceful places, with some of the best architecture, and I mistakenly thought we had the lead on this, but got to say, your Church looked fantastic mate!

I have been in some church's that just bugged me to no end. And then I have been in churches where they had to drag me out....this was one of those churches. This is one of the most magnificent churches I have been to here in the States. I have been to St. Patricks in Boston, a couple of ones in London, more than a fair share in Chicago...St Patricks Cathedral I think was one, but this one was just so impeccable. I was actually surprised they let me in with my camera, but when I spoke to one of the priests there - they actually encourage visitors to come in and take pictures as long as they are quiet about it. Next trip up I want to get some of their pipe organ - it was under some serious restoration when we were there.

There are several churches around the Minneapolis St Paul area. I'll be armed with my camera!!!

If you ever get to Milwaukee, and haven't checked out St. Josephat Basilica, you have to! It's decorated, floor to ceiling with murals and such. I've been in there bunches of times for church, and never get tired of looking at the place.
The other places you have to see are St. Sava's Serbian Orthodox Cathedral, there's floor to ceiling mosaics(I haven't been in there yet) and then Annuciation Greek Orthodox, which was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. It's a very striking structure, and the stained glass is interesting.