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Tips on sharpening your knives
05-08-2010, 11:32 AM
Post: #11
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
Be advised the sharpening steel that comes with some knife sets is not a sharpener. It is used to put a finer edge on a already sharpened knife. Get a sharpener like the one pictured above with a V to drag the knife through. Wal-mart has one made by Smith's for $10 that works well.
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05-08-2010, 05:30 PM
Post: #12
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
I'm getting ready to take my knives to have a pro work them. Anyone have an suggestions on how to find the right pro? No listings in the phone book or online! Confused

Every woman loves a man that can cook! Tongue
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05-10-2010, 06:34 PM
Post: #13
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
(05-08-2010 05:30 PM)crabkitty42 Wrote:  I'm getting ready to take my knives to have a pro work them. Anyone have an suggestions on how to find the right pro? No listings in the phone book or online! Confused

I have mine done by this random guy. He makes the rounds constantly at all the arts/crafts/fabric stores. I swear that's how he makes his living. Funny I know but the guy gets around and has been doing it for years.

I would contact a restaurant supply store to see if they will sharpen knives or know of where you could go to get your knives professionally sharpened. Some upper scale kitchen stores may offer services or at least know where you could go. Do you have a Sur La Table by you? That would be a good start.
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05-12-2010, 01:57 PM
Post: #14
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
An alternative to getting knives professionally sharpened is to use something like a Lansky system, which comes with several stones in progressively finer grades, and a clamp to help you maintain the proper angle. Using them is pretty easy, and you'll get nice results.

-Tim
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05-24-2010, 06:45 PM
Post: #15
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
I have always sharpened my own knives. When you use them for a living, you sharpen them pretty frequently, and you learn to use a stone out of necessity.

Most restaurants provide whats called a tri stone, which is three stones of different coarseness set in a frame. The most coarse one is used for blades that are very blunt, or rounded over. The others are more for maintenance. For home, a small, two sided stone should suffice (nothing too course). These are found at a knife shop or hardware store. If your knife is really dull, a professional sharpening may be advised before trying to maintain it yourself.

When you are using a stone, it should be lubricated with mineral oil, food grade of course (anything else will gum up and ruin the stone). Place it on a towel or something to keep it from moving on you, and have it at a height you are comfortable with. The blade should be held at 15 degrees to the stone. Personally, I go forward then back with the blade, but plenty of folks will say to go only in one direction. Do what feels right for yourself. Apply even pressure on the blade, not too much though. Always try to use the entire surface of the stone by starting at one end and finishing the stroke at the other. This will lengthen the life of the stone and your knife.

Once you have a decent edge, you go to the next finest stone. It could take 5 strokes on either side, or 50, depending on the pressure you apply and how well you maintain a proper angle with the blade. When it feels right, move on to the fine one. Finish with a steel if you like.

If your knife is built up at the end of the blade by the handle (expensive knives like Henckles have this), it can be difficult to sharpen all the way to the end. You can have this ground down professionally, or just deal with it, but eventually your knife's edge will bow and not cut properly (due to not being able to apply pressure evenly across the entire blade when sharpening).

Store the stone moistened with oil (wrapped in a soaked towel in a zip bag works).

One of the fastest ways to kill your knife is to scrape with the edge. If you must scrape with your knife, turn it over and use the top side. Cutting up sand filled leeks is nasty for blades also.

Personally, I shy away from auto sharpeners and pro sharpeners who use grinding devices.
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05-30-2010, 05:47 AM
Post: #16
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
I have a very old set of sharpening stones that i found in the sporting goods dept inside the case was 2 stones one to start with and one to finish with along with a can of oil to "wet" the stone with and i have used them on my Chicago Cutlery knives for over 15 yrs .. along with the knives came a "honing" stick that i just give them a quick swipe now and then to just touch them up in between a good sit down sharpening session of all the knives . hope this helps

"Laisser le bon temps rouler"
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11-08-2010, 12:41 AM
Post: #17
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
It depends on the kind of knife and the kind of job. For the smaller vegetable cutting jobs, a German styled knife is normally used. It is the kind of knife with edgy length of roughly twenty to twenty five centimetre and a firm back, made of a kind of stainless steel. It swings well around the tip and requires subtle sharpness to do the jobs like finely cutting shallots. For this type of knife a none abrasive sharpening steel is used.

For cutting bird carcasses like pigeon, chicken and duck, a Sabatier with an edge of forty centimetres is most suitable. Such a knife can also be used to cut of the legs or large parts of the breast of a turkey. Some people chop up carcasses with a Chinese styled knife. It always leaves a mess everywhere and makes a lot of noise. Sharpening them in any is always a burden. So at least two types of sharpening devices are required. A stone to take of the rough edges and dents as result of cutting bone, and an abrasive kind of sharpening steel to finish it off.

The Japanese styled knifes are very different. It is required to keep them in your fingers instead of your hand. Mostly used for cutting shasimi and sushi. Since these knifes are asymmetrical it is required to sharpen them on a stone. It is not recommended to sharpen them in any other way. Besides that careful use hardly requires any sharpening

For very subtle cutting jobs like really tin slices of tomato or julienne type leeks thinner European styled knifes are sharpened with the none abrasive sharpening steel. Small sized knifes for scraping roots of any kind go with the same device.

Overhearing a conversation of survival army like guys it was noticed that sharaded knifes are best sharpened by repeadedly sticking them into sand forcefully. Seemingly the best way to go I guess but I have never tried since there are very different ways of preparing steak besides the raw way.




(02-16-2010 11:26 AM)Brutus Wrote:  Electric or manual sharpeners...What's best?

http://www.chefschoice.com/tips_sharpen.html
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12-08-2010, 04:25 AM
Post: #18
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
With regards to the heading, in an effort to remain anonymous initiatives are best kept small I guess.



The other day I went by the shop for piece of cooking equipment; a skillet for another steak variation.
The women behind the counter showed and explained the difference in ceramic coatings of the pans. I was altogether not directly convinced but soon the subject changed to sharpening devices, poultry scissors and a lot more. She showed me this ceramic cone shaped device at least 15" in size and base of 7.5" meant for sharpening knifes. Taking it out of the display stand was a somewhat tempting exercise for her and a guess for me. It almost became a touchy moment in time, the way words were uttered and the atmosphere changed from delightfully tasteful to appetizingly hot..... Eventually I left the shop with a pair of poultry scissors having in mind the preparation of pigeon de bresse aux carcasse, remarking: "we are talking about the same but meaning something else" She gave me a look and smile that made me come again.

Then again some people rock but do not roll or if you like some people roll but do not rock.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bomv-6CJSfM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oPXkfdy4Hw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Qki5oy1z14

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fu-jwmyA1nc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yftOy8kz7aE

PS I will follow up on the cone shaped sharpening device.



(12-07-2010 09:18 PM)ePhilosopher9 Wrote:  i find this heading quite diminutive, considering the waterfall et al
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LrcBfwRYLuY&NR=1
oh mandy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GK8-gZVkYsk
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12-10-2010, 01:18 AM
Post: #19
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
(12-08-2010 04:25 AM)BOBEAU Wrote:  With regards to the heading, in an effort to remain anonymous initiatives are best kept small I guess.



The other day I went by the shop for piece of cooking equipment; a skillet for another steak variation.
The women behind the counter showed and explained the difference in ceramic coatings of the pans. I was altogether not directly convinced but soon the subject changed to sharpening devices, poultry scissors and a lot more. She showed me this ceramic cone shaped device at least 15" in size and base of 7.5" meant for sharpening knifes. Taking it out of the display stand was a somewhat tempting exercise for her and a guess for me. It almost became a touchy moment in time, the way words were uttered and the atmosphere changed from delightfully tasteful to appetizingly hot..... Eventually I left the shop with a pair of poultry scissors having in mind the preparation of pigeon de bresse aux carcasse, remarking: "we are talking about the same but meaning something else" She gave me a look and smile that made me come again.

Then again some people rock but do not roll or if you like some people roll but do not rock.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bomv-6CJSfM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9oPXkfdy4Hw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Qki5oy1z14

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fu-jwmyA1nc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yftOy8kz7aE

PS I will follow up on the cone shaped sharpening device.
Ahhh and please do not tell me that I am exaggerating


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(12-07-2010 09:18 PM)ePhilosopher9 Wrote:  i find this heading quite diminutive, considering the waterfall et al
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LrcBfwRYLuY&NR=1
oh mandy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GK8-gZVkYsk
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12-10-2010, 06:17 AM
Post: #20
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
I was a tool maker for years and a fisherman for even longer. I sharpen my own knives. Just me and a stone. Arlene (wife) won't go near my fillet knives. They scare the crap out of her.

I eat, therefor I am.

2011 Ironman Lake Placid - Finisher
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