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Tips on sharpening your knives
12-10-2010, 08:16 PM
Post: #21
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
(12-10-2010 06:17 AM)Detroit Dan Wrote:  I was a tool maker for years and a fisherman for even longer. I sharpen my own knives. Just me and a stone. Arlene (wife) won't go near my fillet knives. They scare the crap out of her.

Filet knives scare me too. They are almost too sharp, especially after being sharpened. I really don't like to even sharpen them.
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12-11-2010, 04:48 AM
Post: #22
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
What kind of tools?

Fillet knifes and boning knifes are used for the finer butcher jobs as far as a known, or just removing flesh from bone. As kid I saw butchers working at a pigs slaughter house just around the corner where I lived. Through the fence you could see rows of pigs hanging upside down being moved slowly by a conveyor belt. These guys used a metal glove in one hand and a relatively small thin knife in the other. I guess that was a boning fillet knife as well. When a new truck with pigs arrived you could hear them scream very differently as they were offloaded and as if they knew something nasty was going to happen to them. That experience did not change me attitude towards knifes; they are just other tools to be careful with.

Fishing that is an old love. Got myself a fly rod last year and have been practising somewhat during the summer, and I am looking forward to actually going out and catch myself something to eat. How do you scale fish? a fillet knife?

Do you use any abrasive with the stone? I have seen people sharpening their knifes at the side of brick masonry. The butchers I saw working on the hogs used a honing steel for sharpening.

As for female sensitivity are we men not always the sharper and rougher counterpart of their conciseness and almost everything we do?



(12-10-2010 06:17 AM)Detroit Dan Wrote:  I was a tool maker for years and a fisherman for even longer. I sharpen my own knives. Just me and a stone. Arlene (wife) won't go near my fillet knives. They scare the crap out of her.
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12-11-2010, 06:58 AM
Post: #23
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
Cool, another fisherman. I also fly fish in the northern Michigan rivers, but most of my fishing is done in the Great Lakes, Detroit and St. Clair Rivers. Usually along the Ohio / Michigan border of Lake Erie. Great Walleye and Jumbo Perch (fresh water perch).
K4RM4 said above that fillet knives are too sharp. True. That is why the edge will break down after only a few fish. I keep 3 knives sharp so I don't have to stop and resharpen when cleaning a cooler full of fish.

I don't scale the fish. A Very sharp knife will cut the skin off.
The brook and brown trout that I catch with a fly-rod, I leave the skin on. It protects the fish from over cooking. Serve skin side down and the meat will just separate.

No abrasives. My stone has a rough side and a smooth side. I only use the smooth side. Often I'll bring them to work and use a granite surface plate (very smooth stone)

I eat, therefor I am.

2011 Ironman Lake Placid - Finisher
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12-12-2010, 09:08 AM
Post: #24
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
Well used to be a fisherman, did not fish for thirty years, used to fish a lot as a kid and truly liked.
Growing older you just want to rediscover it I guess.

I see fillet knifes are very thin; they can be bend by applying some pressure on the tip.
Hardly use that kind of knife but can imagine that it is very useful for following the lines of a fish taking a fillet or just removing certain parts.
By the way are these fishes nice to eat I find pike and the like not very nice but it must a matter of taste. On the other hand trout is a lovely fish gutted they can be steamed with some leeks and ginger they are just greater, and of course the skin if left on. Do you find the cheeks a delicacy or is it just another bite.

I live near the coast in the Netherlands all sorts of fish are available include different types salt water fish. Some of them needs to be scaled normally I use the back side of short strong knife that does trick very well.

I understand that the device I suggested is not very suitable for thin knifes but it may come handy with boning knifes used for butchering deer. It may be a bit silly but I have got the idea that everybody outside the big cities in the north america goes hunting now and then to get the freezer filled.

Now I come to think of it these fillet knifes can be very useful for other purposes as well like
truly slicing tomatoes only for their flesh....Sometimes I like the "sophisticated" type of cooking
like see through ravioli with pieces tomato in the style of elbuli

Now I know which knife and how to sharpen it...! Thanks


(12-11-2010 06:58 AM)Detroit Dan Wrote:  Cool, another fisherman. I also fly fish in the northern Michigan rivers, but most of my fishing is done in the Great Lakes, Detroit and St. Clair Rivers. Usually along the Ohio / Michigan border of Lake Erie. Great Walleye and Jumbo Perch (fresh water perch).
K4RM4 said above that fillet knives are too sharp. True. That is why the edge will break down after only a few fish. I keep 3 knives sharp so I don't have to stop and resharpen when cleaning a cooler full of fish.

I don't scale the fish. A Very sharp knife will cut the skin off.
The brook and brown trout that I catch with a fly-rod, I leave the skin on. It protects the fish from over cooking. Serve skin side down and the meat will just separate.

No abrasives. My stone has a rough side and a smooth side. I only use the smooth side. Often I'll bring them to work and use a granite surface plate (very smooth stone)
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12-12-2010, 09:50 AM
Post: #25
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
"Do you find the cheeks a delicacy or is it just another bite."

Walleye cheeks are the perfect appetizer. I never EVER freeze them. I rarely share them with anyone. When I come home from a day on the lake, I clean all the fish and make myself dinner. The cheeks are sautéed in butter with some lemon and garlic. My wife and Daughter don't eat fish so I get them all. If we have friends over I'll let them try one but the rest are mine. I'll the Vacuum pack and freeze the rest of the fish.

I eat, therefor I am.

2011 Ironman Lake Placid - Finisher
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12-13-2010, 02:39 AM
Post: #26
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
As almost always the details are very inspiring. I like them as well, do not eat them in huge amounts because it will spoil me but it must be rewarding experience after a day of work at the lake. Very tender meat, in combination with proper seasoning a true sensation. Do you have wine with it?

It is like music and other forms of art sometimes there is this detail that you have heard a thousand times before and you know it is going to come but still remains very satisfying and pleasurable.



(12-12-2010 09:50 AM)Detroit Dan Wrote:  "Do you find the cheeks a delicacy or is it just another bite."

Walleye cheeks are the perfect appetizer. I never EVER freeze them. I rarely share them with anyone. When I come home from a day on the lake, I clean all the fish and make myself dinner. The cheeks are sautéed in butter with some lemon and garlic. My wife and Daughter don't eat fish so I get them all. If we have friends over I'll let them try one but the rest are mine. I'll the Vacuum pack and freeze the rest of the fish.
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12-15-2010, 02:33 AM
Post: #27
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
It is a native fish a variant of the pike, brass but genetically totally different.
If I go into restaurant and ask for fresh ones how do I know am not being pushed around.
Or should just bring my rod with me?
Now there is at least one reason to visit North America

Thanks again


(12-13-2010 02:39 AM)BOBEAU Wrote:  As almost always the details are very inspiring. I like them as well, do not eat them in huge amounts because it will spoil me but it must be rewarding experience after a day of work at the lake. Very tender meat, in combination with proper seasoning a true sensation. Do you have wine with it?

It is like music and other forms of art sometimes there is this detail that you have heard a thousand times before and you know it is going to come but still remains very satisfying and pleasurable.



(12-12-2010 09:50 AM)Detroit Dan Wrote:  "Do you find the cheeks a delicacy or is it just another bite."

Walleye cheeks are the perfect appetizer. I never EVER freeze them. I rarely share them with anyone. When I come home from a day on the lake, I clean all the fish and make myself dinner. The cheeks are sautéed in butter with some lemon and garlic. My wife and Daughter don't eat fish so I get them all. If we have friends over I'll let them try one but the rest are mine. I'll the Vacuum pack and freeze the rest of the fish.
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12-15-2010, 08:43 AM
Post: #28
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
(12-15-2010 02:33 AM)BOBEAU Wrote:  It is a native fish a variant of the pike, brass but genetically totally different.
If I go into restaurant and ask for fresh ones how do I know am not being pushed around.
Or should just bring my rod with me?
Now there is at least one reason to visit North America

Thanks again


(12-13-2010 02:39 AM)BOBEAU Wrote:  As almost always the details are very inspiring. I like them as well, do not eat them in huge amounts because it will spoil me but it must be rewarding experience after a day of work at the lake. Very tender meat, in combination with proper seasoning a true sensation. Do you have wine with it?

It is like music and other forms of art sometimes there is this detail that you have heard a thousand times before and you know it is going to come but still remains very satisfying and pleasurable.



(12-12-2010 09:50 AM)Detroit Dan Wrote:  "Do you find the cheeks a delicacy or is it just another bite."

Walleye cheeks are the perfect appetizer. I never EVER freeze them. I rarely share them with anyone. When I come home from a day on the lake, I clean all the fish and make myself dinner. The cheeks are sautéed in butter with some lemon and garlic. My wife and Daughter don't eat fish so I get them all. If we have friends over I'll let them try one but the rest are mine. I'll the Vacuum pack and freeze the rest of the fish.

If you can't catch it locally, I would check with your local fish market. They could tell you where it comes from. Chances are the restaurants get it from the same place.
Yes I have had wine with my walleye cheeks, but usually beer.
After a long day on the water in the sun with a few cold ones, I have to sober up for the drive home. The Very first thing I do when I get home is open a beer. By the time I get ready to cook, I'm already cooked. Rolleyes

I eat, therefor I am.

2011 Ironman Lake Placid - Finisher
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12-16-2010, 02:12 AM
Post: #29
RE: Tips on sharpening your knives
To me it seems that it is a relatively expensive fish. 15 euros per kilo for walleye and european zander zander-perch are between 10 to 12 euros per kilo. the sander vitreus as the walleye is official called is on his home turf often replaced by european counterparts as is the case with other fish - see link below. So I think it is highly unlikely that I will be able to find anywhere in europe even the speciality shops that sell fish I have never ever seen do not have it.

So I think if I want to try it, it requires some travelling.......

Thanks because it is interesting and likely worth a try



http://www.theriondna.com/index-aqss.htm



http://www.theriondna.com/index-aqss.htm


(12-15-2010 08:43 AM)Detroit Dan Wrote:  
(12-15-2010 02:33 AM)BOBEAU Wrote:  It is a native fish a variant of the pike, brass but genetically totally different.
If I go into restaurant and ask for fresh ones how do I know am not being pushed around.
Or should just bring my rod with me?
Now there is at least one reason to visit North America

Thanks again


(12-13-2010 02:39 AM)BOBEAU Wrote:  As almost always the details are very inspiring. I like them as well, do not eat them in huge amounts because it will spoil me but it must be rewarding experience after a day of work at the lake. Very tender meat, in combination with proper seasoning a true sensation. Do you have wine with it?

It is like music and other forms of art sometimes there is this detail that you have heard a thousand times before and you know it is going to come but still remains very satisfying and pleasurable.



(12-12-2010 09:50 AM)Detroit Dan Wrote:  "Do you find the cheeks a delicacy or is it just another bite."

Walleye cheeks are the perfect appetizer. I never EVER freeze them. I rarely share them with anyone. When I come home from a day on the lake, I clean all the fish and make myself dinner. The cheeks are sautéed in butter with some lemon and garlic. My wife and Daughter don't eat fish so I get them all. If we have friends over I'll let them try one but the rest are mine. I'll the Vacuum pack and freeze the rest of the fish.

If you can't catch it locally, I would check with your local fish market. They could tell you where it comes from. Chances are the restaurants get it from the same place.
Yes I have had wine with my walleye cheeks, but usually beer.
After a long day on the water in the sun with a few cold ones, I have to sober up for the drive home. The Very first thing I do when I get home is open a beer. By the time I get ready to cook, I'm already cooked. Rolleyes
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