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Cooking Text Books
04-29-2010, 07:41 AM
Post: #1
Cooking Text Books
I am a firefighter and cook for a large group every 3 days, we have 3 cook books at my fire house, the Culinary Institue of America offers 2 text books worth having, I like The Joy of Cooking, and I use a book of techniques.

To be a firefighter, one can be a lot of things…except a coward.
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04-29-2010, 08:48 AM
Post: #2
RE: Cooking Text Books
My favorite is the Better Homes & Gardens cookbook. All of the recipes have been tested and turn out the way they're supposed to.

A party without cake is really just a meeting
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06-12-2010, 12:30 PM
Post: #3
RE: Cooking Text Books
I just ordered Pat Chapman`s "Vindaloo and other hot curries" book. I used to own a Pat Chapman book called, (I think) 101 Curry Club recipes, which also had a Vindaloo recipe, which was great - a very quick simple recipe, the result a very tasty and (very hot) curry, calling for chilli powder, cayene powder, and (to suit the chef) as many bird eye chillis as you could stand - these went in in the last 10 mins of cooking, (like finger chillis in a Jalfrezi), and made the dish exceptionally hot.
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08-25-2010, 07:45 AM
Post: #4
RE: Cooking Text Books
When I movved out on my own some 35-years ago my mom gave me her old 1950's Betty Crocker Cookbook. Best part about it is that it has all the basics in it, not a lot of extra fluff. A lot of modern cookbooks assume you already know the basics so leave out a lot of the basics. Comes in a small binder book so you can add notes pages. So hit the garage sales, flea markets and antique malls to find one of these treasures.
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09-29-2010, 06:31 PM
Post: #5
RE: Cooking Text Books
Ok thought I'd share this treasure that has been handed down. It is a Chicago Weekly News Cook-Book and Housekeeper's Encyclopedia copyrighted from 1885. It belonged to my great grandmother and some of the recipes are well...... interesting...such as Mock Turtle Soup ---Take a calf's head, and four calf or pig's feet put in a pot of water and boil until the bones slip out. Cut the meat in pieces an inch long, put it back and boil two hours, chop the brains, add eight or nine onions and a little parsley: mix with spices and put in the soup, roll six or eight crackers with half a pound of butter,and when nearly done drop in. Rub the yolks of five hard boiled eggs beaten very light, flour the hands and make this paste into balls the size of a pigeon's egg, throw them into the soup five minutes before it is dished. Stir in a large tablespoon of browned flour, add a teacup of walnut catsup and the juice of a lemon. Serve with sliced lemon.
Ok so I then had to check out what was Walnut Catsup---Take one hundred white walnuts and put in a gallon of vinegar after pounding, put in two tablespoons of salt, a teacup of horse-radish, same of mustard seed and garlic, two ounces of allspice,cloves and nutmeg each, one ounce of black pepper and celery seed. Boil half an hour. Strain and bottle.

There are all kinds of unique recipes and then the general: Housekeeping, Dyeing, Care Of The Sick, Simple Remedies,The Nursery and The Toilet sections.

Thumbing very carefully thru the book I have seen pencil notes left by my Great Grandmother about some of the recipes about if they were good or to add... to the recipe. My Grandfather(her son) was born in 1902 and passed away in 1993. I am thrilled to know that someone from my past has handled this and truly used it, which makes me wonder about my cookbooks and the notes I've penciled in.

"... always throw spilt salt over your left shoulder, keep rosemary by your garden gate, plant lavender for luck, and fall in love whenever you can..." Practical Magic
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04-15-2011, 05:23 AM
Post: #6
RE: Cooking Text Books
If you can find it, I would recommend "The New Settlement Cookbook" -which is an update to the classic one that has been handed down through the generations. Some of the recipes are fantastic, some need a little tweaking to meet your needs. But if you are just starting to cook, and need some old fashioned advice this is the way to go. I use it often for making quick breads and cookies on the fly. While it does not fit in with the "healthy cooking" lifestyle sometimes...it is a treat to use.

"I love deadlines....I love the sound of them as they go WHOOSHING over my head!" -Douglas Adams
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04-17-2011, 11:31 AM
Post: #7
RE: Cooking Text Books
(04-15-2011 05:23 AM)ShrimpCot_1 Wrote:  If you can find it, I would recommend "The New Settlement Cookbook" -which is an update to the classic one that has been handed down through the generations. Some of the recipes are fantastic, some need a little tweaking to meet your needs. But if you are just starting to cook, and need some old fashioned advice this is the way to go. I use it often for making quick breads and cookies on the fly. While it does not fit in with the "healthy cooking" lifestyle sometimes...it is a treat to use.

I agree, for basic cooking, there's nothing like this cookbook, but I have our Grandma's. Smile If I want to cook something like a cake from scratch, or ideas for a soup recipe, that's the book I turn to.

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04-17-2011, 11:31 AM (This post was last modified: 04-17-2011 11:32 AM by Mufasa.)
Post: #8
RE: Cooking Text Books
My wife discovered Savannah cuisine back when we were first bouncing back and forth between there and Wichita.
She was amazed at how good "Southern home cooking" is. I bought one of Paula Deen's cook books, and she has never been the same since.
Dawn knows that I miss Savannah terribly, as well as the fresh seafood, so she tries anything that I show her in any of the many books she has now acquired.
For anyone that has not seen Paula on any of her shows, the food that she prepares is not for the faint of heart - or those
that are even REMOTELY thinking of dieting. It is Southern cooking, after all.
http://www.pauladeen.com/recipes/

Also, Paula's brother runs an incredible seafood joint on the way to Tybee Island (Savannah Beach). http://www.unclebubbas.com/
In this very establishment, I watched my bride consume raw oysters (the first being in Washington), drizzled with lemon juice and horseradish. Funny - when I first met her, her idea of "seafood" was fish sticks...
I have since turned her into a seafood snob - just like me.

Most of us are so caught up in life that we forget to live it.
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06-14-2012, 01:31 PM
Post: #9
RE: Cooking Text Books
2Beers, I was just reading your post about your great Grand-Mother's recipe book going back in the 1800's... Wow, lucky you, to have such a family treasure. I was fortunate to pick up a few of these passed down within my family. The way you describe some of the recipes, I would love to look through this book, and possibly try some of these. Some of the recipes as you described were purposely pushed away from our tables. Not healthy ingredients, but I am sure no one died from them. As to what they tasted, I can pretty much think that they were wonderful. The ingredients you describe in the Mock Turtle Soup are making a come back.... Believe it not. Hold on to these treasures...
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