Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Votes - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Barbecuing corn
06-14-2015, 10:01 PM
Post: #11
RE: Barbecuing corn
Well...

I found this recipe sort of backhanded. I have a half dozen of Jamie Purviance's cookbooks for the Weber grills, and in one of them is a recipe for orzo salad with grilled vegetables. We "Hoover" the salad whenever we make it, if that's any indication. The dressing and vegetable marinade is a mix of olive oil, dijon mustard, balsamic vinegar and minced garlic. (I can post the full recipe on request.) At any rate, I have been using this marinade on the ears of corn (husk completely removed), and grill them over direct medium heat. Yes, the kernels do get a bit browned up, but they never taste burnt. Four minutes on three sides is usually enough to nicely grill the freshest of corn, and we usually all fight over what's left. Wink

One other recipe, again over direct medium heat, is to make a paste of butter, grated parmesan cheese and garlic, perhaps with a little basil or parsley. Some of the butter drips off, but it still comes out quite good, and that little bit of crunchy left-over parmesan...good stuff!

I usually find that I don't need much to marinate the corn--I brush it on and rotate it. It sinks in between the kernels a little if you repeat this a few times over the course of an hour.

Intuitively you'd think it won't work so well, grilling a bare-nekkid ear of corn directly over the coals, but it works well and is a nice change from boiling it.

- Rudy -
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
07-11-2015, 11:03 PM
Post: #12
RE: Barbecuing corn
I do the water soak, full husks, but don't like the tast a "toasty husk" gives the corn so I also wrap in foil. Put up on the high shelf and rotate to cook evenly, No burning and wonderfully tender.

Do deep thoughts and lofty ideals cancel each other out?
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
07-27-2015, 11:48 PM
Post: #13
RE: Barbecuing corn
All I do is remove the silk (I assume those are the little hairs at the tip) and leave it enclosed within the husk. I remove any loose parts of the husk, but I do not peel anything off, which helps maintain somewhat of a seal. No soaking, no real prep.

The corn within never chars, and steams to perfection. I then use two clean welding gauntlets, or 'Ove' Gloves (the steam-protected kind) to husk after it is cooked.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
07-29-2015, 12:18 PM
Post: #14
RE: Barbecuing corn
I have had the best luck with wrapping in foil or placing the stripped corn directly on the grill over medium-high, direct heat (no propane, it's cheating). I like it with a moderate char, but still maintaining a firm kernel texture. I also prefer to use what we call field corn, not the super sweet varieties that taste like someone rolled them in sugar. Once cooked, add a mixture of butter and chili powder, with just a hint of lime.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
07-29-2015, 06:00 PM
Post: #15
RE: Barbecuing corn
I attended a bbq a while back and they shucked the corn. Roasted it over the fire, then smothered it in mayo, rolled it in grated parmesan cheese, then dusted it with paprika. I have to admit it didn't sound to appetizing to me, but it was incredible!!!
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-06-2015, 04:04 PM
Post: #16
RE: Barbecuing corn
We soak the un-husked corn for about an hour in water, wrap in foil and then throw it on the barbeque. We do it over a campfire the same way. Why do some of you remove the silk before barbequing? I always remove the silk after the corn is done. Is there an advantage?

John H.
Hamilton, Ontario
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-24-2015, 06:12 AM
Post: #17
RE: Barbecuing corn
(12-06-2015 04:04 PM)762X39 Wrote:  We soak the un-husked corn for about an hour in water, wrap in foil and then throw it on the barbeque. We do it over a campfire the same way. Why do some of you remove the silk before barbequing? I always remove the silk after the corn is done. Is there an advantage?

It's really hot after cooking and burns my delicate hands.....

Or maybe it's just how I've always done it.
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)