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Making of Fond (Stock or Bouillon) and Sauces
03-12-2014, 10:14 PM
Post: #1
Making of Fond (Stock or Bouillon) and Sauces
Stocks(Fond) & Sauces, always a fascinitating subject and very often mysterious for a lot of people. They appear and seem to be difficult; some are, but the large majority are easy to do. This is basically the first of many, I will try to satisfy all and PLEASE feel free to post your recipes and/or techniques. Do ask questions and put in your request. Again, do remember that I am NOT a chef in any means. It is a serious hobby and passion. I DO NOT know everything. First we need to talk about the making of stock as this is the foundation of many good sauces. What I will publish is going to be more procedure(s) with general ideas than actual recipes. When it comes to Fond (stock or bouillon) there is procedures to follow.
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03-13-2014, 06:34 PM
Post: #2
RE: Making of Fond (Stock or Bouillon) and Sauces
Smile Just the other day I made a lovely chicken stock. I used celery, shallots, onion, carrots and Herbs de Provence as my spices. When it was done I used the broth and made with the leftover chicken along with fresh chopped shallots, onions, celery, mushrooms and Amish noodles into a stew.

"... always throw spilt salt over your left shoulder, keep rosemary by your garden gate, plant lavender for luck, and fall in love whenever you can..." Practical Magic
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03-15-2014, 07:09 PM (This post was last modified: 03-15-2014 07:16 PM by LiveToCook.)
Post: #3
RE: Making of Fond (Stock or Bouillon) and Sauces
Flushed a ''few'' chapters of recipes and procedures as I am installing a new computer and it asked me to re-start as I was installing new programs... Should instead be getting a brain injection!!!
Well here goes...again for me! Let's start with a couple of basic chicken fonds (stock).
The first is basically braised chicken to enjoy as a meal with some stock (and chicken) left to make sauce, soup or whatever requires a good chicken bouillon or stock. And chcken to spare.
1-2-3 whole chicken depending on size of chicken(s) & cooking Tools)

2-3 onions cut in 4
3-4 garlic cloves cut in 2
6-8 carrots again cut up coarsely
2-3 branches of celery
Fresh or dried herbs that you enjoy, it can be a bouquet of anything fresh that includes Rosemary, Taragon, Basil, Dill, Fennel, Coriander, Thym....
Dried, Oregano, Bay Leaf, mixes... Again go with what YOU enjoy and have on hand.
Salt to taste.
You can also add 2-3 tomatoes or 2-3 tablespoons of tomato paste.
Put water in to about half the chicken, remember, you are braising, you do not want to drown the chicken.
Then cook at the normal temperature that you would at about 350° F or higher (up to 385).
This can be a rapid way of making a meal...If you are in a hurry with good chicken stock to spare.
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03-16-2014, 06:33 PM
Post: #4
RE: Making of Fond (Stock or Bouillon) and Sauces
LTC - I have one for my seafood stock. I use the same veg's and fresh parsley and thyme stems with 2 -3 dried bay leaves. 15 peppercorns and 1 cup of dry white wine. Almost forgot - about 4 pounds of seafood shells. My wife thinks I'm nuts for putting the shells in the freezer. It takes awhile to get 4 pounds of shells. Best thing about making your on stock or sauce is you can freeze it.
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03-16-2014, 09:48 PM (This post was last modified: 03-16-2014 09:50 PM by LiveToCook.)
Post: #5
RE: Making of Fond (Stock or Bouillon) and Sauces
Now, let us get into the making of stock (fond) as the chefs would prepare it.
This is basically a ''method'' (recipe) that uses bones and ''leftovers'' that are basically good edible vegetables and meat trimmings that are set aside and not used in the main dishes. One thing that needs to be observed here... if you want to make a stock that does match the chef's and something that you will be proud of is to INCLUDE the fat in... Remember, the fat can and will be removed partially or completely after the stock is made. This inclusion provides taste and a lot of it. Again, you need to remember that you make your own stock to control the quality and primarily have taste.

The procedure here applies to all types of meats, fish, shells and it does not matters if they stand on 4 or 2 legs, fins or whatever swimming tool, have wings and fly or don't.
So to start, what you need to do is basically have bones, some meat onto them, all the trimmings including some fat... Do NOT keep all the fat if there is a lot. The bones open so your stock and sauce will be ''seriously improved'' by the marrow and of course natural gelatine.
So basically from what I can see in my head now should be into pictures on with this text.

Start with the bones, broken up of course to get all the advantages by exposing marrow. Add the trimmings of meat.
Brown this on top of the stove at medium heat... This step has 2 basic functions, 1 to give colour and 2... more taste. Turn them to brown on all sides... The longer they brown (without burning), the better.
Using the same pot, I use large roasting pans (big turkey size), deglaze with white or red wine to recuperate all the sugars from the bones and meat from the bottom of this utensil. Reduce the wine by half.
Then add water and all the vegetables that you want in here.
I use onions, shallots (grey), garlic, carrots, celery, potatoes, tomatoes, fresh herbs, or dried... All to your OWN taste and to what is available. Put salt and liquid pepper such as Tobasco or anything similar. Reason for liquid pepper is simple. In my experiences the typical black peppers (pepper corns) burn easy or simply changes taste to a strong finish. Black pepper should be used to finish a dish either at the pre-serve level or for one's own plate. Water needs to be up to half of the bones. Bring to a boil, cover with the lid and if not available aluminium foil. Then, put into the oven... at 170 deg F and leave into the oven covered overnight. Yes... overnight.... in the oven. Check it out in the morning and make the adjustments that you want, and it may need to cook longer.
Remember, the boiling point is 212 deg F (or 100 deg C)AT 170 deg. F., YOU WILL NOT SET THE HOUSE ON FIRE.

Remember, I use salt and liquid pepper, but lightly... This is a ''Fond'' (Stock), you want this as neutral as possible to be able to use as a base for your sauces, soups or whatever you need it in.
ONE OF A CHEF'S MOST POWERFUL TOOLS IS TO TASTE AS GOING ALONG A MEAL. So do taste and this will tell you a lot. Make adjustments now and then, it is not when the meal is on the serving dish that you can make adjustments.

(03-16-2014 06:33 PM)Phillip Wrote:  LTC - I have one for my seafood stock. I use the same veg's and fresh parsley and thyme stems with 2 -3 dried bay leaves. 15 peppercorns and 1 cup of dry white wine. Almost forgot - about 4 pounds of seafood shells. My wife thinks I'm nuts for putting the shells in the freezer. It takes awhile to get 4 pounds of shells. Best thing about making your on stock or sauce is you can freeze it.

Phillip, this is the way to make it... 4 lbs??? You must make a huge batch.
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04-01-2014, 03:36 PM
Post: #6
RE: Making of Fond (Stock or Bouillon) and Sauces
Thank you for taking the time to share your knowledge LTC!

Any pan sauces you'd recommend using your stocks?

To ask why we cook is to ask why the leaves fall...
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04-01-2014, 08:11 PM (This post was last modified: 04-05-2014 08:40 PM by LiveToCook.)
Post: #7
RE: Making of Fond (Stock or Bouillon) and Sauces
This is on the way... I lack on time and motivation to write and this is a subject that needs reflection on my behalf. I can make a sauce with anything, anytime on (let's call it) reflex. So I need to put down the proper steps and variations in such a fashion and order that all can understand and use it. So, as mentioned, stay tuned.
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04-03-2014, 01:45 PM
Post: #8
RE: Making of Fond (Stock or Bouillon) and Sauces
Hey, I'm the patient type.Big Grin

To ask why we cook is to ask why the leaves fall...
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