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Risotto anyone?
03-02-2015, 10:39 AM
Post: #11
RE: Risotto anyone?
(02-27-2015 01:39 PM)LiveToCook Wrote:  Of course nothing wrong with the options given. But a risotto's main characteristics is the slow absorpsion of liquids and whatever is being used to flavor the rice. This is what makes the risotto so delicious. So I would not recommend the par boil method as the grains will absorb a large majority of water. For cooking time and amount of liquids used and having done the same , I would have to say that you are probably using too large of a cooking surface and/or are using a little too much heat. Of course if you talk to a purist, stove top is the only method. As for wine, white, you can use anything that you drink and say ''yum-yum'' to. Do not use a cheap un-drinkable type, it will ruin your dish, this should apply to all dishes that call for wine. Of course you do not have to use your most expenive. Would you use inferior meat cuts, veggies or products, same applies to wine. If you like your recipe, continue with it, if you would like to experiment with a different one, let me know, I will post mine.

Yes, welcome back!

And thanks for your excellent feedback. I am with you...i think the slow approach is best. I suspect for me it is a wee bit too much heat so i will focus on that next time. I get good results and don't mind that it takes longer...I just wanted to try and reconcile my cook time with what recipes say.

And truly, life is too short to drink (or cook with) poor quality wine!

"I don't cook; I prepare things." My late brother Bill
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09-01-2015, 07:59 PM (This post was last modified: 09-01-2015 08:09 PM by guitarmutt.)
Post: #12
RE: Risotto anyone?
I have been experimenting a lot with risotto this year. I think there really is truth to the slow and easy method. Low heat. Liquid little by little. Ingredients according to cooking time, and taste, taste, taste. Use good, fresh ingredients, as Julia said, just keep tasting.

Today's risotto was cooked with leek, garlic, pasilla chile, red bell pepper and saffron. Plus I seasoned the the leek with fresh ground black pepper and a bit of salt. At the end as a twist, I added Swiss cheese instead of parmesan.

My wine of choice here was a Viognier.

Served with pan seared scallops.

Enjoyed by all.
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09-02-2015, 09:00 AM
Post: #13
RE: Risotto anyone?
Nice!

Looking forward to more of your contributions...

To ask why we cook is to ask why the leaves fall...
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09-02-2015, 09:51 AM
Post: #14
RE: Risotto anyone?
(09-01-2015 07:59 PM)guitarmutt Wrote:  I have been experimenting a lot with risotto this year. I think there really is truth to the slow and easy method. Low heat. Liquid little by little. Ingredients according to cooking time, and taste, taste, taste. Use good, fresh ingredients, as Julia said, just keep tasting.

Today's risotto was cooked with leek, garlic, pasilla chile, red bell pepper and saffron. Plus I seasoned the the leek with fresh ground black pepper and a bit of salt. At the end as a twist, I added Swiss cheese instead of parmesan.

My wine of choice here was a Viognier.

Served with pan seared scallops.

Enjoyed by all.

That does sound good!
My wife just bought a different type of risotto rice (not the usual arborio)...I cannot remember the Italian name though...

"I don't cook; I prepare things." My late brother Bill
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12-30-2016, 10:53 AM
Post: #15
RE: Risotto anyone?
OK...so it has been 15 months since I mentioned the new rice (above). I made risotto a few more times since then but kept using the Arborio rice (I guess we forgot we had bought that new rice).

But for Christmas Eve dinner I grabbed the new stuff which is Carnaroli. It is widely thought of as the "King" of risotto rice. The package said it would be 14 to 19 minutes cook. I was suspicious of that so I consulted the interwebs. Yes, there were many citations for the rice in general but really nothing about cook times for it. Sure enough, it took the usual 60-70 minutes to cook (and it was absolutely not overdone). I am sold on it. As billed, it was very creamy but did not get mushy at all. Great flavor too; the "rice-i-ness" came through despite the strong influence of the wine and the mushrooms that went into the dish. Perfect!

There is a third, common rice used called Vialone nano. I guess it is a shorter grain rice from Veneto in Italy and is starchier and supposedly cooks quicker. As well, some more rare rices that are thought good for risotto are Baldo, Calriso, and Maratell.

Interestingly, my sister made risotto the next night and she used standard Basmati! That was...weird. It of course was a completely different texture. It was very smooshy (that is a technical term Wink ) but was still an interesting alternative (albeit one that I wouldn't do but once in a great while).

Anyway, I hope this helps you risotto fans out there! HAPPY NEW YEAR!

"I don't cook; I prepare things." My late brother Bill
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