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Home Brewing (Wine, Beer, & Hooch)
05-25-2015, 11:34 PM
Post: #31
RE: Home Brewing (Wine, Beer, & Hooch)
Flazer, I brewed via the "soup" method (i.e., using pre-made canned malt rather than malting from scratch,) back in the '90s when I lived up in OR. My best brew was a high-alcohol dark ale that I called "Mahogany Rush IV," after the album. It was also a fine industrial solvent.

Anyhow, the first thing you should look for is a nearby homebrewer's store - 'makes everything a lot more convenient - but that's an either-or proposition.

Generally for equipment you'll need a large stock pot for the malt, a 5 gallon plastic kitchen-type garbage can to use as a sanitation tank, another bucket to catch what's blown out during fermentation, and a glass carboy for the fermentation tank itself. People generally get 5 gal. carboys but I eventually got a 6 gal. one and kept the batches at five, just so there was plenty of space at the top and thus less product blown into the catch bucket during the Heavy Spew Phase that happens when the yeast first kicks into gear.

Along with that you need odds and ends like a hygrometer to measure specific gravity, a little plastic airlock to stick on top of the fermenter after the Heavy Spew is done but there's still CO2 to release, Tygon tubing in various lengths to get the liquid from one place to another, and a keg and whatever that needs (like a fool I bottled everything, so I don't know how kegging's done.)

Lastly, it's important to live in a cool climate and/or have some effective A/C, because any temp above 70 degrees is uncomfortable for the yeast, therefore will kill the fermentation. Yeasty-beasties only work when they're happy, and nothing pisses them off like heat.

'Lots of stuff I'm forgetting 'cause it's been a long time, but it's a blast to concoct your own brews and unleash them on friends and family at parties. Even cooler is trading them with other homebrewers and comparing notes.

"Waiter...can you stop that noise? What you call 'music.' It sounds like dirty water. How can they eat food - and listen to ****?"
- Sabina (Lena Olin) in The Unbearable Lightness of Being
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07-29-2015, 12:50 PM
Post: #32
RE: Home Brewing (Wine, Beer, & Hooch)
I was happy to find this thread upon searching, but saddened at the amount of activity. Maybe it can be rejuvenated. I've been home brewing for about 12 years. It's a fun blend of art and science. I tend to be one of the more technical types, although you don't necessarily have to be to enjoy the hobby. I've dabbled in many styles, but prefer the English style ales and their Americanized counterparts. Space Cadet mentioned trading. I'd definitely be up for that. I have a good circle here locally, consisting of a couple of pro-brewers and a few excellent home brewers. Good feedback is essential to becoming a better brewer and I always welcome more. Especially if it means getting to sample and enjoy the work of others.
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08-04-2015, 05:40 PM
Post: #33
RE: Home Brewing (Wine, Beer, & Hooch)
Hi, Matt.
I wish there was more activity in this thread, though I mostly go through a couple other sites to get my beer and brewing jones taken care of.
I've been brewing for 7 or 8 years now, I think...
I brewed an Imperial Oatmeal Stout that I bottled last week. I took a gallon of it and have that aging on oak cubes soaked in bourbon.
I have plans for a couple more brews in the next couple months - one a Brett IPA, another for a pale ale in the New Albion style.
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11-18-2015, 06:14 AM
Post: #34
RE: Home Brewing (Wine, Beer, & Hooch)
(08-04-2015 05:40 PM)JrGtr42 Wrote:  Hi, Matt.
I wish there was more activity in this thread, though I mostly go through a couple other sites to get my beer and brewing jones taken care of.
I've been brewing for 7 or 8 years now, I think...
I brewed an Imperial Oatmeal Stout that I bottled last week. I took a gallon of it and have that aging on oak cubes soaked in bourbon.
I have plans for a couple more brews in the next couple months - one a Brett IPA, another for a pale ale in the New Albion style.
Well, maybe it would be a little more active if I were around more. Had to take a break from things electronic for a while due to hand/arm surgery.
The stout sounds tasty. How did it turn out? Be careful with Brett. It's insidious. It can be difficult to chase out of the brewery.
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