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Tips on BBQ, Grilling and Smoking
04-26-2010, 11:54 AM
Post: #11
RE: Tips on BBQ, Grilling and Smoking
try soaking them overnight pratt62
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04-26-2010, 01:39 PM
Post: #12
RE: Tips on BBQ, Grilling and Smoking
We're very partial to the smoked pork shoulder. It's very easy and very good. I cook it in an inexpensive electric smoker (about $60 from the big box home store). All you add is pre-soaked (overnight) wood chips, plug it in and add the meat. Cook until the internal temp is at least 185-190 degrees to insure all the connective tissue is broken down. Now the pork will "pull" apart easily with a fork. I also found that dry rubbing the pork the day before really adds to the flavor....some mixture of brown sugar, onion powder, garlic powder, cayenne, black pepper, and chili powder...Thanks for the BBQ forum.!
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04-27-2010, 08:56 PM
Post: #13
RE: Tips on BBQ, Grilling and Smoking
Try going to the box store with the orange paint scheme (Home Depot). They have 30-40 lbs bags of chunk smoking wood. There is Hickory, mesquite, and others. As we live in Wisconsin we have access to apple, pear and other good smoking woods. The trick is getting the word out that you will take the wood when they are trimming or cutting down the trees. Bribes of smoked products sometimes help. I wonder if I have anything in the freezer to smoke?



Huh

"... always throw spilt salt over your left shoulder, keep rosemary by your garden gate, plant lavender for luck, and fall in love whenever you can..." Practical Magic
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04-30-2010, 09:25 AM
Post: #14
RE: Tips on BBQ, Grilling and Smoking
2Beers has got it right. BRINE! Try a basic salt water solution first and then go to adding some flavors like OJ and brown sugar depending on the meat. I'm totally sold on this technique for improving the flavor and texture of the meat and introducing flavors. Look it up!
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04-30-2010, 10:46 AM
Post: #15
RE: Tips on BBQ, Grilling and Smoking
(04-20-2010 06:50 PM)spudpotatohead Wrote:  This might also do the trick as its designed to use inside a smoker:

http://www.partshelf.com/maet73.html


Excellent help, thanks.

If all the world really is a stage, how come I'm always carrying the duct tape?

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04-30-2010, 09:01 PM (This post was last modified: 04-30-2010 09:09 PM by david950.)
Post: #16
RE: Tips on BBQ, Grilling and Smoking
(04-19-2010 04:43 AM)Polandmason Wrote:  [Couple of things: If you can get it, try a cut of pork called a Boston Butt.

Amen, brother. The first thing I ever did low and slow was a butt (or pork shoulder, or picnic roast, or any of the other names). It's tasty meat, and it's cheap - I can get it on sale for $0.99/lb sometimes.

I rub my butts with mustard (plain old yellow), then whatever pork rub I'm using at the time. I've messed around with cutting under the fat cap (to make a flap), then poking holes and stuffing garlic inside too.

Anyway, I try to keep 225-250 for the 6-9 hours it takes to cook a 6-8 lb butt. I cook to 196 internal, then wrap the butt in foil and an old bath towel and let it rest in an ice chest for about an hour (and up to four). When ready to eat, I "pull" (shred) it with hands or forks, then serve it on plain white buns or just by itself on a plate. I serve sauce(s) on the side, but to each their own.

Due to differences in fat content, each butt cooks at its own pace - cook to temp, not to time.

It's really hard to screw up, everybody loves it, and you it freezes well.

I also like to get pork "steaks" cut from this same cut - super easy (and quick) to cook - just as hard to screw up as the whole butt.
(04-19-2010 07:41 AM)Brutus Wrote:  I was wondering how best to monitor the core temperature of your meat without constantly opening your smoker thus allowing all that good smoke and heat to escape.

I live and die by my Maverick RediCheck ET-73 Thermometer. There are two probes - one for the meat, one for the internal temp of your grill (not so important for the propane guys). Both connect to the base unit which sends both temps to the wireless remote. The wireless remote has programmable high and low alarms for the grill temp, and a high alarm for the meat. I work from home quite a bit, and have used this to do baby back ribs, monitoring the grill temp from my desk, many times. I've also used it for a couple of overnight smokes (butts and such), allowing me to grab some shut-eye.

Knock, Knock!
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05-01-2010, 09:08 AM
Post: #17
RE: Tips on BBQ, Grilling and Smoking
Sounds just like what I've been looking for. Thanks for the tip.

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05-06-2010, 06:37 AM
Post: #18
RE: Tips on BBQ, Grilling and Smoking
I do not work or am trying to endorse the Big Green Egg - but for anything BBQ it is the ideal grill (so it is a smoker, grill, pizza oven, etc). Easy to use it will maintain a temperature of 200-225 for long hours and also you can get it hi up to 600 for the pizzas. They are NOT cheap and if you're one of those 'light the gas' grill you may find it tedious to build the charcoal fire - but if you're willing to put up the time or prefer lump charcoal to briquets or gas - this is the beast for you!
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05-12-2010, 10:19 PM
Post: #19
RE: Tips on BBQ, Grilling and Smoking
Texas Bar-B-Q. Hickory? Mesquite? Pecan? Cooking time depends on how much time you have and how good you want the food to be. Smoked pinto beans? Yes......if you have time.
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08-11-2010, 02:27 PM
Post: #20
RE: Tips on BBQ, Grilling and Smoking
I noticed that Bubba expresses his preference for slicing into the meat to see if it's done, which works, but there are ways of determining if the meat is done without slicing it open (which lets the juices seep out), including the thermometers others have referred to (which are pretty good these days). I have some less than scientific methods for checking to see if the meat's done. For beef, after you've cooked one side and flipped it, watch it closely -- when beef is medium rare, it will begin to ooze blood on top. For me, that's the perfect time to take it off (if you prefer it incinerated, let it keep cooking). Also, I usually use my less than sterile technique of pressing the top of the meat with my index finger after I've flipped it and cooked the other side for awhile to see how firm it is, with soft and mushy meaning cook it some more, and firm meaning I've hammered it (clean hands preferable for this technique -- it's less than scientific but works for me). For meats other than pork, I pretty much incinerate them to make sure they're cooked all the way through.
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