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Drumming
09-28-2010, 07:10 PM (This post was last modified: 09-28-2010 07:15 PM by VincentUlyssis.)
Post: #31
RE: Drumming
Any music chain should have them or online. I got mine at "The Long Island Drum Center." They ship. Dennis would be happy to help you.

I was practicing double bass earlier and found that my ummm "privates" were very sore afterwards. Has anyone (male drummer particularly I assume) experienced this? Very strange...
My single, double and triple paradiddles are coming along at least...building up speed in spite of my lack of regular practice.
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09-28-2010, 07:44 PM
Post: #32
RE: Drumming
We only have a few local stores. I have a feeling the high schools and junior highs snatch them up like hotcakes. I dont get a chance to shop for them often, but its a bit frustrating when I go into a music store, ask for a practice pad, and the guy tries to sell me a drum set that looks like it got rolled down Mount Ranier. And my wife keeps warning me that I keep up the beating on the steering wheel, and its my.......well, you know. I can't help it. My drumming goes from the side view mirror to whomever it sitting next to me in the truck.

I cannot advise on the latter. I am not any sort of drum set whiz. B dum bum - CRASH!

Primary Principle - "It must NEVER be my fault"
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10-10-2010, 08:27 PM
Post: #33
RE: Drumming
I'm overdue for a lesson. Our drum teacher Mike was in London doing drum clinics. I'm looking forward to it.. My progress is slow but evident. Gio, on the other hand, auditioned for his school's 7th grade chapel band. Those kids know how to rock! he'll be rotating with several other young drummers. He's excited about drums. It's part of his identity and something he feels respected for. His triplets and quads are amazing for 12. He has tremendous momentum and so much potential.
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10-18-2010, 07:45 PM
Post: #34
RE: Drumming
I happened to see this article in the pizza parlor. It's our locally famous drum teacher Mike!

The Rudiments of Life: A Drummer’s Summit
Author: Drew Moss | Published: Wednesday, September 29, 2010
Mike Sorrentino & Joe Chirco by Drew Moss
Mike Sorrentino & Joe Chirco by Drew Moss

When I planned to sit down with Joe Chirco and Mike Sorrentino, two of the Island’s—and the planet’s—finest drummers and drum instructors, the goal was to get beyond the nuts and bolts of drumming and into the spirit of sound. With that intention, but no expectation, I recently managed to snare these two very busy musicians for a sitdown at Chirco’s comfortable and inviting Bayport home.

When Joe is not locking it down for some of the best acts on the national jam band scene (he’s currently playing with Mark Karan, David Nelson, Donna Jean Godchaux and the mighty Zen Tricksters) and “Tino” is not bathing in the bright lights of Broadway as the orchestral drummer for In The Heights, the two are dedicated and inspired drum educators; shamans at the edge of the village, pounding out the intricate tribal language by fireside for the entire village to drink in, dance to and live by.

Unless he’s driving the calypso-rhythmic pulse of In The Heights, or sitting on the throne of classic rock royalty with Ritchie Blackmore and Joe Lynn Turner of Rainbow, Sorrentino can be found at ground zero of some of the best music ever born in these parts as the drummer for both the club circuit anchors Kid Gloves and Big Shot, the country’s biggest Billy Joel tribute band (big enough for the Piano Man himself, who has sat in with the band on many occasions).

Amazingly, these are merely the side gigs that actually complement Sorrentino’s primary musical mission as the global education coordinator for Hudson Music, the country’s leading producer of drum instructional books, videos and DVDs.

Both Chirco and Sorrentino are consummate chops masters with impeccable and tireless practice habits whose styles, influences and capabilities are limitless. But technical proficiency is a small part of what they share. It’s their deep love of playing, their infectious attitude towards the rudiments of life that make them special.

“What gets me off is that I still get to play drums every day,” Sorrentino said emphatically as he dropped his magic hands instinctively into an air drum roll. “Sure playing 150 dates a year is great, playing with Billy (Joel) was a total thrill, of course playing with Rainbow and Ritchie (Blackmore) was a blessing that took me around the world,” he shared. “But it’s knowing that I get to do this (another little seven stroke air fill) for a living. That’s where it’s at for me.”

Chirco was quick to affirm a similar sentiment. “I’ve always followed my heart,” he smiled, still glowing from a thrilling west coast weekend playing with Mark Karan (long time guitarist with Bob Weir & Ratdog) at the Grateful Dead-inspired Furthur Fest in California.

It’s a journey that has taken Chirco through some darker spaces, ultimately shooting him out the other side bigger and better.

“The Zen Tricksters took me all over the country,” Chirco remembered, “and when Phil (Lesh) called Jeff (Mattson) and Rob (Barraco) to join him with Phil and Friends, I thought ‘I’m done.’ I completely shut down. It was like a bad breakup. But eight years later, I’m a lot stronger for the experience.”

imageMaturity and spiritual growth are primary themes for these brothers of the downbeat.

“I have half the chops now I had when I was twenty five,” laughed Sorrentino. “But I’m ten times the drummer because I understand myself better as a person. And I understand my role in the music on such a higher level.”

“Because you have balance,” Chirco added, the two of them already trading verbal licks in a polyrhythmic dance. “I meditate now. You know, we have the same conversations with ourselves over and over. Meditating quiets those voices down and allows other voices to have their say. It really opens you up as a player and a person.”

Sorrentino picked up on the theme perfectly. “Oh, I’m very bad with that, the inner conversation. It’s only now that I have the maturity to go with my practice and playing that I’m able to let a lot of things go and be a better musician for it.”

“It’s all about communication,” emphasized Chirco. “As a drummer and as a musician in general, I’m not all that interested in chops and who can do what and how fast your hands are. I’m interested in the conversation. It’s about taking this conversation right here, the vibe of it—and taking it in there.”

“There” is Chirco’s drum studio—a Utopian garden of sound with two expansive, multi-layered drum kits set up in a breathtaking array of size and scope, a full range of adorning brass cymbal regalia (he’s a Zildjian man) with shoots and leaves of various international and intergalactic percussion in every nook and cranny.

“I want to see Mike’s face when I open this door,” Chirco smiled as we headed in. Upon entering, Sorrentino—himself is a bona-fide gear-head and nationally endorsed player— let loose a series of exuberant expletives.

But in the thick of the garden, only one thing caught my eye. Joe had set up a third throne and percussion station. “I would never forget you,” he said as he put his arm around my shoulder. “Let’s play.”
And suddenly, there it was. Clear as a bell. Or a snare. Or a rack tom. Or a kick drum.

The spirit of sound.

To find out where to see Joe Chirco or Mike Sorrentino live, check their websites for tour updates. jchirco.com and mikesorrentinomusic.com.

-Long Island Pulse Magazine
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11-26-2010, 08:58 PM
Post: #35
RE: Drumming
Gio's 13th Birthday just passed, so we went with Uncle Joe, my brother, to Long Island Drum. Bought heads (Evans coated G2's) for all of our toms. We also picked up a used Sabian AAX China for G to wail on for quarter notes which is big for "his" genre.
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11-26-2010, 09:20 PM
Post: #36
RE: Drumming
Don't you love wandering through stores and pawn shops and spotting that NEW TOY!!!! GOODY GOODY GOODY!
Let the bartering begin! I probably spent more time scrounging for sounds than I did actually ordering or purchasing new cymbals from local music shops. Sure - there were necessities that you simply could not locate in pawn shops, but I was always thrilled when I walked into one... and there it was... a Wuhan 16 inch fast crash, or a Zildian 22" Dry Ride.
My daughter has one of my old favorite, a 16" Zildian medium/thin crash on her wall. It was drilled and routed along a crack, and held together for years after that.
I miss that part of the bands. It always seemed that there was someone causing issues in every one of them though.
It amazes me that the fellas have managed to remain close friends and still do what they do, even after oh so many years.

Most of us are so caught up in life that we forget to live it.
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11-26-2010, 09:45 PM
Post: #37
RE: Drumming
Brotherly love...symbiotic success. The combination made them who they are, otherwise it would have been something completely different and I doubt with the accomplishments that have come forth... was like the combination of gasoline, wood and a match...any element missing would have meant less, and would have had less of a bang in my opinion. It all came together in a way that can be described as unusual happenstance.
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11-27-2010, 11:57 AM
Post: #38
RE: Drumming
Go two gigs coming up. One at a High School in Feb. and one at a party...both paid. YES!!! My name is flying around town. My phone is ringing off the hook!! For years I sat in my studio and banged away, not wanting to confront the fact that I was playing drums to play in front of ppl. Ten years of no gigs and sitting around feeling sorry for myself. I finally made some phone calls and the gigs are flowing again. At 41, I feel like a teen again. Still hate the "breakdown" and "setup" X2. Also, in order for me not to hit the "wall" I've had to start doing pushups again. Improved my drumming immensely. Just getting to the point where I am transferring the work from my wrists and hands to my fingers. It's all coming back!!
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11-27-2010, 02:07 PM
Post: #39
RE: Drumming
(09-28-2010 07:10 PM)VincentUlyssis Wrote:  Any music chain should have them or online. I got mine at "The Long Island Drum Center." They ship. Dennis would be happy to help you.

I was practicing double bass earlier and found that my ummm "privates" were very sore afterwards. Has anyone (male drummer particularly I assume) experienced this? Very strange...
My single, double and triple paradiddles are coming along at least...building up speed in spite of my lack of regular practice.

I wish I had good enough equipment for double bass. The double pedals I have are so old, cheap and rusty that I never really learned how to use them. I have two questions....

1) What double pedals do you recommend? DW5000?? Everyone loves those. I saw some new ones by Pearl and Yamaha at Guitar Center. that felt good.
2) What instructional tape for double-bass is best?

Thanks in advance!
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11-27-2010, 04:48 PM
Post: #40
RE: Drumming
Never wore out my DW - and it saw loads of travel over the years.
Go with what feels good (was that straight liner or what?)

Most of us are so caught up in life that we forget to live it.
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