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Birds and Butterflies
03-27-2011, 02:46 PM
Post: #31
RE: Birds and Butterflies
Cool bird recipe 2Beers.

BrianW: Yeah, I too prefer my butterflies to arrive on their own "Free Will." Besides they're more interesting living than dead in a frame!

Bought and planted a nice Forsinthia. Planted it in a nice spot where it can "just do its thing." Pretty yellow bloom!
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03-28-2011, 08:04 PM
Post: #32
RE: Birds and Butterflies
Ruffed Grouse, Pheasant and the occasional mallard. They are beautiful and a selective harvest makes for the most delightful meal.

Pheasant takes the flavour of chicken to a whole new level. Its chicken X10 on the flavour scale - absolutely wonderful!. If you can find Ruffed Grouse that have feed on blue berries and birch catkins then you've just entered a portal to flavour heaven.

Mallard, its an acquired taste -which I love- akin to organ meats. My favourite method is pan fried breast, skin on, RARE(has to be rare) in a splash of olive oil. Simple spice - a dash of salt, ample black pepper and a few leaves of coriander. Remember RARE is the key.
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03-28-2011, 08:39 PM
Post: #33
RE: Birds and Butterflies
A man after my own heart. I manage at least one or two pheasants a year. If cooked right, they have absolutely no gameyness at all. I have had it several ways, once in a sweet orange sauce, and a couple times made into a stew of sorts. Others are just pan fried. I have had ruffed grouse - that was in London once, but I have never had duck. Goose is another one I just never had the pleasure of.

Primary Principle - "It must NEVER be my fault"
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03-28-2011, 09:38 PM
Post: #34
RE: Birds and Butterflies
Hi Boomer, pleasure to make the acquaintance.

I left goose out, because I didn't want the members to think I was a raving meat hunter. But wild goose is wonderful as well, both Canada and Snow's. It surprisingly has the texture and and taste of roast beef. The key to all wild game and in particular the geese and duck is to cook it rare. These animals don't suffer from force feeding and cramped conditions. As a result, there is very little fat - hence the skin being left on to add additional flavour and moistness-

I've come to love the gameyness (sp?) of wild meats. After all, I could easily go to the market and get myself farm raised mass produced stuff so why waste the shells. But for those that might want to try a milder version..soak the meat in buttermilk overnight. It will draw the blood and drastically remove the gameyness making it more palatable to the newly initiated.

In Ontario, we're blessed with an abundance of wild meats that can be responsibly harvested without any impact to the populations. I suppose half the enjoyment of a great wild meal is the appetite resulting from an athletic day in the bush or my marsh blinds with my dog Hendrix. Arrive home, strip off the layers of gear...have a smoke while cleaning the kill, start a pot of rice and go down to the cellar to find an appropriate vintage. Enjoy a delicious plate of whatever you caught that day, reflecting on the highlights and then off to bed for the most satisfying sleep that only a day like that can bring you.

anyways....that's just how I like it
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03-29-2011, 08:13 AM
Post: #35
RE: Birds and Butterflies
Pheasent is fine unless you've had the joy of spitting out the buckshot pellets.

"... always throw spilt salt over your left shoulder, keep rosemary by your garden gate, plant lavender for luck, and fall in love whenever you can..." Practical Magic
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03-29-2011, 09:36 AM
Post: #36
RE: Birds and Butterflies
(03-29-2011 08:13 AM)2Beers Wrote:  Pheasent is fine unless you've had the joy of spitting out the buckshot pellets.

2Beers: Its often an impression by non-hunters that the bird would be filled with shot....but I don't think I've ever chomped on a pellet in my life and I've had more wild game dinners than I can accurately count. Rarely would I even find one (both after cooking and while cleaning) In fact, often times you'll wonder if the bird even got touched by pellets. It was clearly dispatched, but how, sometimes remains a mystery. I think many pass right through. It still amazes me to this day.

Buckshot would never be used by an ethical hunter. Its large and designed for big game such as deer or stag and even then its frowned upon as its a "shot in the dark" type of load. Slugs are better for that application. When targeting birds...#4 to #7 lead shot for upland game and #2 to BB steel shot or any other non-tox alternative such as tungsten or tungsten matrix for fowl.
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03-29-2011, 10:53 AM
Post: #37
RE: Birds and Butterflies
I would love to try some wild birds like that, although I have never been fond of rare meats.

Once I was in a thrift store and I found an old record album from around 1959 called “Music for Dining”, and I brought it home so I could play it with a meal (hey, why not?).

It had a different passage of music for each course of the suggested meal, and the main entrée, accompanied by the song “Clopin Clopant”, was suggested to be “duckling with orange sauce, bathed in flaming brandy”.

I drove my better half crazy while I phoned every restaurant in town trying to find one that would serve this dish, so I could experience the meal written about on the back of an old record sleeve (I am weird like that). I finally did find one, and off we went so I could get my duckling, although it did not come with the flaming brandy (probably just as well). In the end, it wasn’t bad, although their soup was better. I think I needed a better restaurant, or at least a better cook.

-Rey

Well-weathered leather, hot metal and oil, the scented country air..
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03-29-2011, 04:29 PM
Post: #38
RE: Birds and Butterflies
Chompin on birdshot? What? If its cleaned right you dont ever have that. In fact the only time I ever had any shot in any meat that I have brought home was in a squirrel that didnt get cleaned correctly. I have cleaned my own game before that had some shot left in the carcass, but always made sure to check it thoroughly before cooking.

One of my favorite dishes for hunting is a very simple dish my wife calls "squirrelly beans". She takes two or three squirrels, wraps them in some sort of cooking cloth, and lets them cook into a pot of whatever beans she has, usually a white bean or pinto bean. When the meat has tenderized, she will pull the bundles out, pull the meat out, and put the meat back in the pot. When you are pheasant hunting thats a great dish to have for lunch between hunting times. They usually need a bit more seasoning but that pot of beans is great!

And no they are NOT high in cholesterol!

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03-29-2011, 04:33 PM
Post: #39
RE: Birds and Butterflies
My FIL (retired dentist and alround blokes bloke), is a cracking shot, and usually downs birds with a head shot.

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03-29-2011, 04:45 PM
Post: #40
RE: Birds and Butterflies
(03-29-2011 04:33 PM)NWoBHM Wrote:  My FIL (retired dentist and alround blokes bloke), is a cracking shot, and usually downs birds with a head shot.

That's a good wing shooter.
(03-29-2011 04:29 PM)boomer Wrote:  One of my favorite dishes for hunting is a very simple dish my wife calls "squirrelly beans". She takes two or three squirrels, wraps them in some sort of cooking cloth, and lets them cook into a pot of whatever beans she has, usually a white bean or pinto bean. When the meat has tenderized, she will pull the bundles out, pull the meat out, and put the meat back in the pot. When you are pheasant hunting thats a great dish to have for lunch between hunting times. They usually need a bit more seasoning but that pot of beans is great!

And no they are NOT high in cholesterol!

Never had squirrel but I understand they are delicious.
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