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Interesting Old Recipe
02-01-2011, 04:24 PM
Post: #21
RE: Interesting Old Recipe
I also have to say thanks for sharing that, very cool and original.
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02-15-2011, 01:29 PM
Post: #22
RE: Interesting Old Recipe
Had a chance to make this recipe. Of course I used whole milk and real butter. Ideally it would have been better to research the type of flour used in those days, and try to get something more authentic like stone ground, but I couldn’t find that so I ended up using common all purpose flour. If it was summer I might of taken a drive into the country and looked for one of those little signs that say “eggs for sale” at the end of a little farm drive, and I probably could have talked them into some real milk straight from a cow too. But this is just an easy test, so I just used items available from the grocery store.

These ingredients are pretty simple, used in lots of things, and we are guessing it is maybe a pancake type of recipe. Because of the yeast, I am also thinking it could be some kind of bread. Here is the recipe again in english:

2 pounds of flour
1.5 liters of milk (I used whole milk)
6-8 eggs (I used 6 eggs)
3/4 pound of butter (3 sticks of real butter)
20 grams of yeast ( .70 of an ounce, I used around 3 packets that equaled .75)

Here is the big mixing bowl and the ingredients:

[Image: recipe1.jpg]

The milk was very cold from the refrigerator. I have read that cold can keep the yeast from working, so I warmed the milk up first in a pan on the stove to luke warm. Since I am going to try and fry this up as pancakes, I’m not sure what function the yeast will have, but it’s in the recipe, so in it goes. Then I added the eggs, the softened butter, and the flour. I stirred it up with my spoon but it was getting pretty lumpy, needs more stirring:

[Image: recipe2.jpg]

This is a pretty big bowl, and it’s making quite a lot of batter. Here is where we find out if it is making batter or dough. With all the milk, the end result is very runny, so I don’t think it will become a dough for baking bread. It seems more like a pancake or waffle batter, actually even thinner than those.

So time to start cooking the cakes, or in German, the Pfannkuchen. Since I had a stick of butter left, I used that to grease the pan, making the little pat of butter skate around the pan like my grandma used to do. I poured the batter into the pan, and since its so thin the four cakes I tried to make all ran together, and needed to be separated after they started cooking.

[Image: recipe3.jpg]

The pfannkuchen were turning out to be very thin, so I am thinking this is really like some kind of crêpes. I kept making more and more, four at a time, until I filled up a good plateful. Then it was time to eat and try it out. I just used regular syrup on mine, although because of their crêpe like quality they would probably also be good with fruit or jam on them. This will be Valentines Day dinner for Lori and I, for better or for worse:

[Image: recipe4.jpg]

So how did they taste? Not bad actually, but very different than any other pancakes that I have had. They are not very sweet tasting, more of an eggy flavor, Lori says it tastes more like French toast. It seems like the syrup is really needed to add some sweetness, I tasted some plain and it was on the bland side.

But I think in these modern times we are used to everything being very sweet. I can picture food from the mid 1800s being kind of bland in comparison, in fact I would expect it. The difference I’m sure is that modern pancake mixes have sugar, while this has none.

But it was definitely good enough to enjoy, and we did eat our fill. After we were done though, there was still a ton of the batter left in the bowl. All that I cooked hardly made a dent in it, this is a huge portion. So as bad health wise as all the eggs, whole milk, and butter sounds, we only ended up eating a small portion of it.

[Image: done.jpg]

Since I didn’t know for sure if this was really a pancake recipe, I decided to use some of the leftover to pour into a bread pan and try baking it, just in case it was supposed to be some kind of bread. I put it in the oven at 400 degrees for about 30 minutes, and this was just a guess. After a while Lori called out from the kitchen “Its doing stuff!”, so I came to check on it and it was rising just like a loaf of bread. Interesting, I guess the yeast was still working. But later it collapsed back down and deflated. It also seemed like the inside didn’t cook very well, staying very moist in the middle, and being crunchy on the outside, it wasn’t right.

[Image: recipe6.jpg]

I tried one more time, this time lowering the temperature to 350, and cooking it for an hour and 15 minutes, trying to get the inside cooked. It did the same thing, rose up and collapsed, and ended up a very crunchy cake sort of thing, but the inside still not done enough. It tasted kind of like a piece of cornbread, only without the corn, and not sweet. Maybe more like a sour bread taste.

[Image: recipe7.jpg]

So there you have it, the old recipe imprinted in iron has come to life, maybe as intended, maybe not. I admit I am a beginner to cooking, so this was just a fun little experiment to try, and I didn’t even make much of a mess.

-Rey

Well-weathered leather, hot metal and oil, the scented country air..
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02-15-2011, 03:41 PM (This post was last modified: 02-15-2011 03:42 PM by Nettie.)
Post: #23
RE: Interesting Old Recipe
Hmm, could this be a german pancake recipe? You grease a cast iron skillet, pour in the batter, and bake it in the oven. It does puff up and then collapse. Served with jam, or fruit topping, not syrup.
I'll ask my mom, she's made that quite a few times.
The other possibility is popover batter, but it's kind of thin for that.

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02-26-2011, 08:35 PM
Post: #24
RE: Interesting Old Recipe
Are you sure its not for waffles?
I couldn't really tell from the picture what it was that you took the original recipe off of, but I thought it kind of looked like a old waffle iron...?

"Life ain't like books.
Books got somebody writin' 'em and tryin' to entertain ya.
Life is more like a set of Legos.
Unless you take care of 'em, you lose a few pieces and you end up steppin' on 'em with bare feet.
You gotta take care of your life."
~Laura Moncur
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02-26-2011, 09:21 PM
Post: #25
RE: Interesting Old Recipe
Pfannkuchen - when I researched this recipe it looks "close" to more of a crepe type dish than a waffle or pancake. I also saw a recipe to use the batter with hashbrowns to make potato cakes and cover with apple sauce. I will talk to my Amish friends in the Amanas and see if they know exactly what this is, but I assume from the lack of a sweeter taste these would tend to be a crepe of some sort.

Primary Principle - "It must NEVER be my fault"
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02-26-2011, 09:54 PM
Post: #26
RE: Interesting Old Recipe
It's my lack of utensils that I could not try all the possibilities. I don't have a waffle iron, or an iron skillet to try Nettie's idea. But I really do think it is crepes too. We put the pot of batter in the icebox and fried up the leftovers the next day, this time instead of the syrup, we put strawberry jam on them. They were excellent with that on them, really good.

I have been to the Amana Colonies too Boomer. I really like the "family style" dining they have there. Great place to gain some weight, and enjoy yourself doing it!

-Rey

Well-weathered leather, hot metal and oil, the scented country air..
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02-27-2011, 11:02 AM
Post: #27
RE: Interesting Old Recipe
Gain some weight? THATS how I did that. Well, I can tell you when I was young dumb and hungrier than a horse, we used to stop by the Ox Yoke Inn for lunch, and they had something called the Cowboy Table where the working men would all sit together at the table, and they would just start bringing out plates of food to pass around. As long as you had your working clothes on you could sit down at THAT table and just gorge yourself. It was just simple home cooked Amish food, but after dinner you couldnt hardly breathe let alone walk a mile of fence dig a 6 foot wide hole recover a section corner and walk back. You couldnt even make it out of the TRUCK.

When I ride thru on my Harley I like to stop at the Meat Shop and grab some meat stuffs for home. Or go to the Bakery and grab about anything out of there.

Primary Principle - "It must NEVER be my fault"
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03-14-2011, 09:33 AM (This post was last modified: 03-14-2011 09:34 AM by Lamb Chop.)
Post: #28
RE: Interesting Old Recipe
Enjoyed the whole read, thanks.
That'd be cool just to experiment with it more Rey, see if you can make a bread out of it?

I once asked Mr. Rogers for his autograph
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03-14-2011, 09:50 AM (This post was last modified: 03-14-2011 11:11 AM by Rey.)
Post: #29
RE: Interesting Old Recipe
(03-14-2011 09:33 AM)Lamb Chop Wrote:  Enjoyed the whole read, thanks.
That'd be cool just to experiment with it more Rey, see if you can make a bread out of it?

I'm kind of done with it myself. But, who knows, I might make another batch in the summer.

-Rey

Well-weathered leather, hot metal and oil, the scented country air..
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05-31-2014, 04:10 PM
Post: #30
RE: Interesting Old Recipe
That's the exact recipe my Austrian mother used to make palatschinken...Austrian crepes....

Great thread Rey, really takes me back...

To ask why we cook is to ask why the leaves fall...
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