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In Common
04-11-2011, 10:44 AM
Post: #21
RE: In Common
Oh...it sounds like a long and gradual process. Good thing I've gotten rather used to being slow and clueless. I do look forward to getting my brain back some day, though. My kids are 6 and 3. Teenagers? They'll be in boarding school or somewhere long before that time! (Just kidding) Actually I will be in the looney bin long before then! Mommy-brain and all!
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04-11-2011, 12:17 PM
Post: #22
RE: In Common
My son turned 18 this year and my brain is still occupied; in fact about as occupied as it was during the terrible two's stage. Only they are smarter and craftier with the teen brain Confused But I wouldn't have it any other way! Heart Love my son!!

Have you ever heard the saying that when you have a child you can't wait for them to start talking, then when they do you wonder when they are going to shut-up and then when they are teenagers you wish they would talk to you again. So true!!

FAITH is fear and doubt standing in HOPE. Angel
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04-11-2011, 01:07 PM
Post: #23
RE: In Common
LOL SoG. I am terrified of when my daughter becomes a teenager. She's a hell-raiser now, at the age of 6! Love her to bits!
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04-11-2011, 01:12 PM
Post: #24
RE: In Common
(04-11-2011 12:17 PM)State of Grace Wrote:  My son turned 18 this year and my brain is still occupied; in fact about as occupied as it was during the terrible two's stage. Only they are smarter and craftier with the teen brain Confused But I wouldn't have it any other way! Heart Love my son!!

Have you ever heard the saying that when you have a child you can't wait for them to start talking, then when they do you wonder when they are going to shut-up and then when they are teenagers you wish they would talk to you again. So true!!

My son talks all of the time, even when no one is listening, and even when my ears are tired, I keep telling my husband, and myself...........that I'm thankful he can talk, and that he wants to talk to us.

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04-11-2011, 01:57 PM
Post: #25
RE: In Common
I think there are many who would pay money to have their kid talk to them. Funny how the grass is always greener! My daughter is intensely shy when around people she doesn't know, and won't talk at all to some. When I tell them how much noise she makes at home they don't believe me!
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04-11-2011, 02:08 PM (This post was last modified: 04-12-2011 03:08 AM by NWoBHM.)
Post: #26
RE: In Common
Quote:I think there are many who would pay money to have their kid talk to them.

My sisters youngest son is autistic, (my Nephew). Not able autistic, not semantic pragmatic, not autistic savant, just silence and BIG problems for them for years. He is nearly sixteen, and pretty much never uttered a single word, although now he says, eyes, ears, mouth etc, if prompted.

How do you cope with that in later life?

His elder brother BTW, is a genius, and as you say over there, "aced his boards" in his exams........

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04-11-2011, 02:12 PM
Post: #27
RE: In Common
(04-11-2011 02:08 PM)NWoBHM Wrote:  
Quote:I think there are many who would pay money to have their kid talk to them.

My sisters youngest son is autistic, (my Nephew). Not able autistic, not semantic pragmatic, not autistic savant, just silence and BIG problems for them for years. He is nearly sixteen, and pretty much never uttered a single word, although now he says, eyes, ears, mouth etc, if prompted.

How do you cope with that in later life?

His elder brother BTW, is a genious, and as you say over there, "aced his boards" in his exams........

Oh wow. That would be really tough. Another reminder to count our blessings!
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04-11-2011, 02:21 PM
Post: #28
RE: In Common
I dont know how they survived it, marriage intact, and elder brother doing so well in exams.....they were both cursed and blessed.........although he has been very difficult, they have had a load of laughs with him too.....maybe that`s the secret?

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04-11-2011, 02:29 PM
Post: #29
RE: In Common
(04-11-2011 02:21 PM)NWoBHM Wrote:  I dont know how they survived it, marriage intact, and elder brother doing so well in exams.....they were both cursed and blessed.........although he has been very difficult, they have had a load of laughs with him too.....maybe that`s the secret?

My son is autistic as well, and it's circumstances like the one you shared, that make me very thankful that my son does talk.

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04-11-2011, 02:45 PM (This post was last modified: 04-11-2011 03:03 PM by NWoBHM.)
Post: #30
RE: In Common
For a few years (around 2 when speech should be developing), we thought the same was about to be visited on us and our youngest daughter - What followed was many speech therapy sessions, psychologists, tests, (I am sure you have been there too), I clung desperately to the fact autism is rare in girls, (funny evidence there about how girls and boys minds work - especially with speech), but it was the most desperate low time of my life, and started a sort of diary - the semantic problems with sentence construction, she would say, "why the houses painted are?" She steadily came through, helped tremendously by her birthday, (in September) so with rising 5`s she did not go to school until 5 a full year behind some of the kids in her year. Her speech therapist was the best....a brilliant person.
You would not know it now...but it was awful at the time -
Yes Bagel - the autistic spectrum is wide, my nepthew is off the scale I am afraid, but a lot do exceptionally well in life, and those whe are autistic savant are considered geniuses.

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