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What about salt?
05-01-2010, 05:46 AM
Post: #11
RE: What about salt?
I use kosher salt for everything. Although I do notice with baking, the kosher salt doesn't always dissolve completely and every once in a while you take a bite of your sweet baked good and get a little bite of salt. I guess I should be using regular iodized salt for baking (smaller crystals), but I don't really mind the little salt surprise. I like salty-sweet!
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05-01-2010, 06:26 AM
Post: #12
RE: What about salt?
Not to be too pedantic about it here, but isn't salt just, well, salt? I don't mean the seasoned kinds that have little bits of dried onion or whatever in it, but whether it comes from the sea or mined from underground or is kosher or not... it's all just one sodium atom and one chlorine atom. Innit?

"Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbour. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain
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05-03-2010, 09:43 AM (This post was last modified: 05-03-2010 04:37 PM by Nung.)
Post: #13
RE: What about salt?
Yes, of course, salt IS just salt when it is has been "processed" for cooking purposes. Most table and kitchen salts have undergone processing so that they are nothing more than NaCL. But it is the less processed salts that many of us are referring to and in that case there will be trace minerals and other trace elements that give the salt some additional flavors. So choosing a "gourmet" salt can be a reaction against over-processing. Plus, there is that hard to quantify sense of place when choosing a gourmet spice....knowing you are choosing something that both represents a specific geographical region and also helps support the local economies. It is similar to choosing many other ingredients...sometimes we might feel that ordinary onions are fine, other times we feel that those sweet onions from Maui are the best choice.

"I don't cook; I prepare things." My late brother Bill
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05-03-2010, 05:01 PM
Post: #14
RE: What about salt?
Speaking of salt, I recently discovered a seasoning salt called Goya Adobo Seasoning.

Highly recommend the stuff. It works very well in Mexican dishes. And no, they're not paying me to say that! Angel
[Image: 41bPRaFR3pL._SL500_AA300_.jpg]

"Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines, sail away from the safe harbour. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." - Mark Twain
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05-04-2010, 12:46 PM
Post: #15
RE: What about salt?
I use plain old table salt for most sauces since it tends to be uniform in size and dissolves easily. I use sea salt when sauteing vegetables to help draw out the moisture. I also keep coarse ground sea salt on hand for brines or certain marinades.
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05-04-2010, 03:50 PM
Post: #16
RE: What about salt?
(05-03-2010 05:01 PM)old honda rider Wrote:  Speaking of salt, I recently discovered a seasoning salt called Goya Adobo Seasoning.

Highly recommend the stuff. It works very well in Mexican dishes. And no, they're not paying me to say that! Angel
[Image: 41bPRaFR3pL._SL500_AA300_.jpg]

agreed. their products are quite good!
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05-14-2010, 06:49 PM
Post: #17
RE: What about salt?
Don't want to sound like a greenhorn, but it's good old Morton's for me... Been cooking many years, and now using less and less salt. It seems the older I get, the more I like to let the true flavors of veggies shine through. Less is more Smile
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05-18-2010, 05:19 AM
Post: #18
RE: What about salt?
(05-14-2010 06:49 PM)DahliaDiva Wrote:  Don't want to sound like a greenhorn, but it's good old Morton's for me... Been cooking many years, and now using less and less salt. It seems the older I get, the more I like to let the true flavors of veggies shine through. Less is more Smile

Less is More is a great album by Marillion too....

I use virtually no salt at all in my cooking preferring guests to add their own to their individual tastes. However what I do add is indeed Kosher salt. When I add salt at the table I have a cellar of white sea sale and a rock of pink/rose salt from the Andes for grating.

I know that technically salt is ...well salt, but try a few different salts and you will see that they have distinctive flavors. A good NY Strip practically cries out for a touch of easily dissolved fresh grated Andes sea salt mmmmm....

November is now MOvember. Knowledge is POWER and the Mustache is KING. Support mens Health and my Mustache farm here: http://mobro.co/counselor
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05-18-2010, 08:51 AM
Post: #19
RE: What about salt?
Even though our family is large (8 people live in our house) we rarely use salt. We can buy regular table salt and it will take us nearly 2 years to go through it. I find when you use lots of herbs, seasonings and marinades then salt becomes a detractor. Besides so many foods now a days has so much salt in it. Like canned vegetables!
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05-19-2010, 09:01 AM
Post: #20
RE: What about salt?
I use Pacific Sea Salt, coarse. I put it in a grinder and use it that way. When it comes to baking I use iodized but usually less than is called for. For those of you who have a Penzeys nearby, their spices are great, I get all mine there and they have a large variety to choose from.
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