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Egg Boiling...art or science
12-08-2011, 08:08 PM
Post: #1
Egg Boiling...art or science
This will be my first post since becoming a grill member. So, thought I would keep it real basic. However, I have a nack for complicating simple functions...

I like a boiled egg early in the morning. Sometimes the egg is easy to peal. Lately the pealing process has been quite frustating. Chunks of egg stuck to small bits of shell, shell stuck to the egg breaking the egg in half.

How do I boil an egg with the confidence that the shell will slide off without incident?

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12-08-2011, 08:25 PM (This post was last modified: 12-08-2011 08:26 PM by Mufasa.)
Post: #2
RE: Egg Boiling...art or science
Welcome Lanix

Place the eggs in a pot of COLD water. Be sure there is at least an inch of water above the top of each egg. If your cold tap water is not very cold, let the eggs sit in the cold water for about five minutes, then replace that water with more cold water. The idea is to equalize the temperatures of the eggs and water so that both the water temperature and the egg temperature start out the same. (If you just put refrigerator-cold eggs in water warmer than they are, the water will heat up faster than the eggs and the eggs may crack. Some people add a teaspoon of salt or vinegar to the water when they are cooking eggs. This supposedly helps keep the inside of the egg from oozing out if an egg shell cracks. I do not use either salt or vinegar, because I have found that starting with the eggs and water at the same temperature prevents the eggs from cracking as they cook.)
Place the pot with the eggs and water over high heat until the water comes to a full boil. IMMEDIATELY take the pot off the heat and cover with a tightly-fitting lid. The eggs will cook from the heat of the water. The eggs do not need to be, and should not be, boiled. Overcooking eggs causes the iron in the yolk and the sulfur in the white to combine, and this is what makes that ugly greenish color around the yolk.
Let the eggs sit in the pan in the hot water for 12 minutes for medium eggs, 15 minutes for large eggs and 18 minutes for extra large eggs. This timing is very important.
Drain the eggs and fill the pot with cold water. I like to empty and re-fill the pot several times to make sure the heat of the eggs doesn’t heat the water back up again. You can also put ice cubes in the water. The water should be very cold. Letting the eggs sit in the cold water until the eggs are completely cooled helps the papery membrane stick to the shell, instead of to the egg, and makes the egg easier to peel.
Let the eggs cool completely. To peel the eggs, gently tap the large end of the egg against a hard surface like your kitchen counter. This should crack the shell. Turn the egg and crack the other end. The shell should peel off very easily.
Hard boiled eggs in the shell can be refrigerated up to one week. Hard boiled eggs out of the shell should be used right away.

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12-08-2011, 08:42 PM
Post: #3
RE: Egg Boiling...art or science
If you think about it, it sounds kinda crazy. Hard boiled eggs will last
about a week. Yet, they will last about three weeks in the fridge if
you don't cook 'em at all. Smile Also, you'd think that shell would provided a
hermitic seal. Oh well.
Thanks for the tip.
I use to have great HB eggs, but in recent years have been having
trouble with the peeling part as well. I thought it was too many
hormones in the chickens nowadays ! lol
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12-08-2011, 09:43 PM
Post: #4
RE: Egg Boiling...art or science
That's exactly the same method I use, Muffy! Except, once the eggs have cooled, I empty the water, put on a lid and shake the eggs in the pan to crack the shells. It makes them super easy to peel.

If I'm doing deviled eggs (one of Ren Man's faves) I put the yolks in a sandwich bag, add mayo salt & pepper and then mix that in the bag. Then I snip a small bit of the lower corner off the bag and pipe the filling right into the white shells. Super easy and neat!

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12-08-2011, 09:45 PM
Post: #5
RE: Egg Boiling...art or science
The peeling problem is due to the freshness of the eggs, BUT:
If you let the cooked eggs sit in cold water for a while, they are easier to peel.
I have also found that if you peel them in a bowl of cold water(underwater), it's easier to peel them.

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12-08-2011, 09:47 PM
Post: #6
RE: Egg Boiling...art or science
Good advice Muffy. Ianix if they are store bought eggs not a problem, but if you buy them fresh from a local farmer give them a few days. New eggs don't peel as well.

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12-08-2011, 10:24 PM
Post: #7
RE: Egg Boiling...art or science
(12-08-2011 09:43 PM)Scythe Matters Wrote:  If I'm doing deviled eggs (one of Ren Man's faves) I put the yolks in a sandwich bag, add mayo salt & pepper and then mix that in the bag. Then I snip a small bit of the lower corner off the bag and pipe the filling right into the white shells. Super easy and neat!

That is brilliant! Seriously...I am going try that next time! Thanks SM!

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12-09-2011, 10:46 AM
Post: #8
RE: Egg Boiling...art or science
Wow. Thanks all for the flashback of helping my mom make egg salad. And I do remember the pan of cold water afterwards. She always peeled the eggs in a stream of cool water from the tap, washing off the shell. Her top secret: add a teaspoon (or two) of Goulden's spicy brown mustard. Jonesing now.

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12-09-2011, 04:17 PM
Post: #9
RE: Egg Boiling...art or science
Thank you all for the excellent advice. I took Mufasa's directive and had a wonderful deshelling experience this morning. Certain atomospheric pressure or moon phase the culprit, I am relieved to know tempature control makes all the difference.

Scythe Matters - I need to try your method of shaking the eggs in the pan before peeling...sounds like a great idea.

2Beers - had no idea old eggs peel better.
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12-12-2011, 05:44 PM
Post: #10
RE: Egg Boiling...art or science
Not really sure of the science behind it, but old eggs do peel better. You can also tell a fresh from an old egg when trying to fry an egg. Old eggs, the white will spread out all over your pan. Fresh eggs, it just sits there. We have about a dozen layers here on our little "slice" and if I am going to make egg salad, I use old eggs and follow most of the steps above for cooking times, and shake them to crack the shell when done, letting them soak a bit in cold water after helps too.

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