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The Best Beef We've Ever Served
01-02-2012, 09:15 AM (This post was last modified: 01-02-2012 09:17 AM by VincentUlyssis.)
Post: #1
The Best Beef We've Ever Served
Christmas Eve. Talk about waiting until the last minute. I felt like Bob Cratchet buying his goose on the way home. Stopped in the King's Park Butcher and they were out of the roast my wife had requested.

I asked about Filet Mignon (Hey, I love my family-why not splurge?!) and he recommended a roast of that cut. Anyone know the name?

In any case I learned something important. The butcher knows how long and what temp to cook the meat. He also taught us how to let it "rest" for 20 minutes prior to slicing. When the meat is cooking the juice comes forth. If you cut it right away, the juice drains out.

By letting it "rest" the meat reabsorbs the juice. The result was the most tender piece of meat I have ever eaten. My wife made the gravy from a 2009 Bardolino based on a Julia Child recipe . We only made half of it. The following night we invited some dear friends and cooked in about 15 minutes less (~45 min. at 350). It was the best beef we have ever served!
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01-02-2012, 10:59 AM
Post: #2
RE: The Best Beef We've Ever Served
Sounds like a tenderloin roast, Vincent. It also sounds delicious! You always let roasted meat-of any kind-rest before carving. Now you know why Tongue

If I'd known you were French, I'd have worn galoshes...
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01-02-2012, 02:25 PM
Post: #3
RE: The Best Beef We've Ever Served
That is great piece of meat to put on the grill. Place on high heat for about 2 minutes per side. Then place it on the cool side. Low and slow. I wrap my steaks in tin foil while they are resting. Then pour the juice that has collected at the bottom of foil and pour it over the meat when you serve it.
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05-28-2012, 11:18 AM (This post was last modified: 05-28-2012 11:22 AM by LiveToCook.)
Post: #4
RE: The Best Beef We've Ever Served
I can I describe this one... The following is a more ''scientific'' way of describing the tenderness of meats after a ''resting'' period. Meats are of course muscle tissue and the explanation that I have been told by different chefs and for what is written in the more technical recipe/food books. Under heat the meat tenses up as if working out, when you pull from the heat source(whatever it might be). You let it rest, and you cover it (with aluminum foil, cover or bowl) so it does not cool down too rapidly. The idea of letting meat stand is a little more complexe as to the times it actually rest, as for 20 minutes, this applies to the larger pieces of meat and types such as beef. Some meats should stand for as low as 5 minutes such as some chicken pieces or even thin beef steaks. Contrary to the old ''Have a steak hot off the heat source or it will spoil'', a steak should stand and yes it does make a huge difference, I have tried it with an extra steak cut immediately off the grill and the others standing for 10-15 minutes, the difference is remarkable. Restaurant's little tricks! Some of the other cooking methods for example are as if you were making a ''pulled type'' meat that has cooked for let's say a 12 hour period. You will ''pull'' it apart immediately if you want the pull type, but if you will let stand, this piece for a 20 minute period. It will not fall apart if you decide to serve it sliced... tenderness along with taste will still be a part of the experience.
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