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Food Under Pressure??
05-31-2012, 08:01 PM (This post was last modified: 05-31-2012 08:05 PM by LiveToCook.)
Post: #11
RE: Food Under Pressure??
I can only agree with all that has been written here. My mother used a ''Presto'' for as long as I remember and I use prestoS, I have 4 of them. The things you can do in them... Ribs for example, you put some good beer in (yes perfectly good beerBig Grin) in place of water, rub the ribs with your favorite dry rub, add some lemon juice onto the meat and steam for 30 minutes. Let cool, if you try to pull out when too hot, they will fall apart. This process will melt some of the fat out. Then you can finish either on the BarB's grill or in the smoker. If anyone is interested I can post the recipe step by step. Going back to the pressure cooker, you have to keep in mind that as long as the orifices are NOT blocked by something from the inside... No problem(s), if the seals are dried up, the unit will not seal and it will not cook properly under pressure. If you need something cooked rapidly, this will do it!!! And to my taste, it will do a better job than a slow cooker. When it comes to canning meats and sauces, you can do it with one of the jumbo units and if you follow the right procedures, you will never have any food poisoning. My Italian, Spanish and Portuguese friends that do canning, for the whole family, all have units that are so big... they use them on gaz burners in the back yard or in the garage. Those sessions by the way are interesting parties in the falls, I had the priviledge of attending (and working). They also all have units that are more in the normal stove top sizes.
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12-08-2015, 01:01 PM
Post: #12
RE: Food Under Pressure??
I know this is an old thread but I'm new around here so I thought I would revive it. My only experience with a pressure cooker was in the Armed Forces while on field exercises. We would use one with about a cup of water in it to heat up our foil pouch meal packages. Using a Coleman stove we could heat 30 pouches in a couple of minutes (I was really impressed). Some people actually use a small one while camping over a single burner stove to prepare meals using a minimum of water and fuel. I think that I'll purchase one after Christmas and give it a go. If it wasn't for this thread, I would have forgotten all about Pressure cookers. Might be a good way to tenderize cheap beef or pork...

John H.
Hamilton, Ontario
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12-10-2015, 06:09 PM
Post: #13
RE: Food Under Pressure??
Welcome to the group 762x39, yes it is worth the buy. No old threads here, just dormant ones that need a bit of a shake once in a while. I use the ''Presto'' make and I have no complaints about them. I know that there are many other makes and even some electric ones. They all seem to work well, I guess like any other tool, you just need to make your classes with all. As for tenderizing meats, it works, no questions about this. You can do all sorts of bean class products, veggies, soups, and so on. This is a tool used all over the world and it has been for many years. I have fair experience using one, so dont be shy, let me know if I can help
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03-13-2017, 03:17 PM
Post: #14
RE: Food Under Pressure??
So I was prepared to start a new thread about my new pressure cooker/crock pot gizmo but saw this older thread....so revive it will!

My mom, like many in the 60's, used a pressure cooker on the stove to save time and make lesser cuts of meat more tender. I never used one myself...I guess like many, I was a bit scared of the thing blowing up.

But recently my wife bought one of the new all-in-one designs and I do like many aspects of it. The speed of cooking certainly is a good thing. And it has made me revisit many of those filling, comfort food-like stews and soup recipes.

The thing does take some time to get used to but seems worth the effort. Anyone using one?

"I don't cook; I prepare things." My late brother Bill
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03-14-2017, 08:47 AM
Post: #15
RE: Food Under Pressure??
(03-13-2017 03:17 PM)Nung Wrote:  So I was prepared to start a new thread about my new pressure cooker/crock pot gizmo but saw this older thread....so revive it will!

My mom, like many in the 60's, used a pressure cooker on the stove to save time and make lesser cuts of meat more tender. I never used one myself...I guess like many, I was a bit scared of the thing blowing up.

But recently my wife bought one of the new all-in-one designs and I do like many aspects of it. The speed of cooking certainly is a good thing. And it has made me revisit many of those filling, comfort food-like stews and soup recipes.

The thing does take some time to get used to but seems worth the effort. Anyone using one?
Nice... You will really enjoy the use of this phenomenal tool! As thge trend is picking up, there are now some excellent recipe books available out there. One that I recommend is ''225 Best Pressure Cooker Recipes'' by Cinda Chavich. The recipes contained in this book are simple and proven, I have tried quite a few and they are all very good. Go for it and let me know if you try them or need help.
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03-14-2017, 11:46 AM
Post: #16
RE: Food Under Pressure??
He lives!

To ask why we cook is to ask why the leaves fall...
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03-14-2017, 03:30 PM
Post: #17
RE: Food Under Pressure??
(03-14-2017 08:47 AM)LiveToCook Wrote:  
(03-13-2017 03:17 PM)Nung Wrote:  So I was prepared to start a new thread about my new pressure cooker/crock pot gizmo but saw this older thread....so revive it will!

My mom, like many in the 60's, used a pressure cooker on the stove to save time and make lesser cuts of meat more tender. I never used one myself...I guess like many, I was a bit scared of the thing blowing up.

But recently my wife bought one of the new all-in-one designs and I do like many aspects of it. The speed of cooking certainly is a good thing. And it has made me revisit many of those filling, comfort food-like stews and soup recipes.

The thing does take some time to get used to but seems worth the effort. Anyone using one?
Nice... You will really enjoy the use of this phenomenal tool! As thge trend is picking up, there are now some excellent recipe books available out there. One that I recommend is ''225 Best Pressure Cooker Recipes'' by Cinda Chavich. The recipes contained in this book are simple and proven, I have tried quite a few and they are all very good. Go for it and let me know if you try them or need help.

Thanks for the advice! I checked it out and I think I will order it.
So far, the only odd thing is that the actual pot is convex so that the middle of the pot is slightly raised. That is not a problem when doing soups and stews but many of the recipes call for using the saute feature first. But with a convex pot, the oil and/or juices run to the edges and leaves the center dry. So I just keep stirring to move around the oil/juices.

"I don't cook; I prepare things." My late brother Bill
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03-14-2017, 04:31 PM (This post was last modified: 03-14-2017 04:32 PM by LiveToCook.)
Post: #18
RE: Food Under Pressure??
(03-14-2017 03:30 PM)Nung Wrote:  
(03-14-2017 08:47 AM)LiveToCook Wrote:  
(03-13-2017 03:17 PM)Nung Wrote:  So I was prepared to start a new thread about my new pressure cooker/crock pot gizmo but saw this older thread....so revive it will!

My mom, like many in the 60's, used a pressure cooker on the stove to save time and make lesser cuts of meat more tender. I never used one myself...I guess like many, I was a bit scared of the thing blowing up.

But recently my wife bought one of the new all-in-one designs and I do like many aspects of it. The speed of cooking certainly is a good thing. And it has made me revisit many of those filling, comfort food-like stews and soup recipes.

The thing does take some time to get used to but seems worth the effort. Anyone using one?
Nice... You will really enjoy the use of this phenomenal tool! As thge trend is picking up, there are now some excellent recipe books available out there. One that I recommend is ''225 Best Pressure Cooker Recipes'' by Cinda Chavich. The recipes contained in this book are simple and proven, I have tried quite a few and they are all very good. Go for it and let me know if you try them or need help.

Thanks for the advice! I checked it out and I think I will order it.
So far, the only odd thing is that the actual pot is convex so that the middle of the pot is slightly raised. That is not a problem when doing soups and stews but many of the recipes call for using the saute feature first. But with a convex pot, the oil and/or juices run to the edges and leaves the center dry. So I just keep stirring to move around the oil/juices.
This is the ''joys'' of working with new tools... You just have to adapt with all new ''toys'' no matter what they are. One recommendation that I can do to you is to do the browning or sauteing in a different unit such as a pan, And do not forget to recuperate your juices, sugars and flavor from this step. In my opinion the unit you have, even it being very good, is built wrong. I would say that the central part should be deeper for liquid accumulation for steaming. Then again, without knowing the extent of the ''lump'' in the middle, you could do the browning within the extremities. And with this construction, make sure that you have more liquid to prevent build up (sticking) on the bottom otherwise you will be using a lot of ''elbow grease'' to clean it. Have fun!!!
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03-14-2017, 04:46 PM
Post: #19
RE: Food Under Pressure??
Excellent points, LtC.
I am trying to stay with the "1 pot" concept for awhile so am sauteing in the main pot for now, at least when doing true, 1-dish meals. (But on Sunday I opted to make a simple Spanish rice dish in the pressure pot and then did my chicken and mushies in a pan on the stove as well as some carrots and kale in another pan on the stove.)

But I am with you on avoiding the need for too much elbow grease, post prandial.

"I don't cook; I prepare things." My late brother Bill
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03-16-2017, 01:20 PM
Post: #20
RE: Food Under Pressure??
(03-14-2017 08:47 AM)LiveToCook Wrote:  
(03-13-2017 03:17 PM)Nung Wrote:  So I was prepared to start a new thread about my new pressure cooker/crock pot gizmo but saw this older thread....so revive it will!

My mom, like many in the 60's, used a pressure cooker on the stove to save time and make lesser cuts of meat more tender. I never used one myself...I guess like many, I was a bit scared of the thing blowing up.

But recently my wife bought one of the new all-in-one designs and I do like many aspects of it. The speed of cooking certainly is a good thing. And it has made me revisit many of those filling, comfort food-like stews and soup recipes.

The thing does take some time to get used to but seems worth the effort. Anyone using one?
Nice... You will really enjoy the use of this phenomenal tool! As thge trend is picking up, there are now some excellent recipe books available out there. One that I recommend is ''225 Best Pressure Cooker Recipes'' by Cinda Chavich. The recipes contained in this book are simple and proven, I have tried quite a few and they are all very good. Go for it and let me know if you try them or need help.

We ordered a used copy of the book.
Thanks, again!

"I don't cook; I prepare things." My late brother Bill
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