Poll: Salt Saboteur
This poll is closed.
Old Iron Skillet 50.00% 2 50.00%
Sea Salt 50.00% 2 50.00%
Total 4 votes 100%
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Salt or Salty
01-23-2012, 05:30 PM
Post: #11
RE: Salt or Salty
I use a SOS pad or something similar to clean the skillet. That way you get the bit of pieces off. After you dry the skillet be sure to season the skillet with some kind of cooking oil. Just wipe the oil on and out it away. If not the skillet will rust spots.
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01-24-2012, 10:02 AM
Post: #12
RE: Salt or Salty
(01-23-2012 05:30 PM)Phillip Wrote:  I use a SOS pad or something similar to clean the skillet. That way you get the bit of pieces off. After you dry the skillet be sure to season the skillet with some kind of cooking oil. Just wipe the oil on and out it away. If not the skillet will rust spots.

I think my guru Alton Brown would frown up this approach. His advise and what may have caused the problem is to scrub the pan with Salt and a but of oil that way the "seasoning" is not ruined. If the pan were cleaned this way and not completely wiped out, there may have been a salty residue in the pan...

If I remember correctly scouring will ruin the "non-stick" seasoning created over time. Could be way off and wrong though...

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01-24-2012, 05:13 PM (This post was last modified: 01-24-2012 06:34 PM by Nettie.)
Post: #13
RE: Salt or Salty
If you took the chicken straight out of the bag without thawing or rinsing first, then the heavy salt probably came from the glaze that is on the chicken. The brine that is used in a lot of IQF (individually quick frozen) products is quite salty (yeah, its brine), so as it melted from your chicken it stayed in the pan.
Always best to give IQF products a rinse if possible (savory items anyways, no salt on berries or peaches).

If that was not the case, then yes, sea salt is saltier that regular table salt. Kosher and iodized salt are pretty much equal in my experience, but there are a lot of new salt varieties out there these days for us to play with, so it is prudent to know what your working with before you administer it. Pop a small amount in your mouth before using it, and try tasting different salts side by side if you have the time. Have a couple of glasses of water on hand to cleanse the palate and avoid dehydration.

Hope this helps.


post fixed by nettie
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01-27-2012, 06:54 PM (This post was last modified: 01-27-2012 07:01 PM by Lanix.)
Post: #14
RE: Salt or Salty
(01-24-2012 05:13 PM)Buckwheat Wrote:  If you took the chicken straight out of the bag without thawing or rinsing first, then the heavy salt probably came from the glaze that is on the chicken. The brine that is used in a lot of IQF (individually quick frozen) products is quite salty (yeah, its brine), so as it melted from your chicken it stayed in the pan.
Always best to give IQF products a rinse if possible (savory items anyways, no salt on berries or peaches).

If that was not the case, then yes, sea salt is saltier that regular table salt. Kosher and iodized salt are pretty much equal in my experience, but there are a lot of new salt varieties out there these days for us to play with, so it is prudent to know what your working with before you administer it. Pop a small amount in your mouth before using it, and try tasting different salts side by side if you have the time. Have a couple of glasses of water on hand to cleanse the palate and avoid dehydration.

Hope this helps.


post fixed by nettie

Excellent advice. I was not aware of the IQF. Thanks
(01-24-2012 10:02 AM)Counselor Wrote:  
(01-23-2012 05:30 PM)Phillip Wrote:  I use a SOS pad or something similar to clean the skillet. That way you get the bit of pieces off. After you dry the skillet be sure to season the skillet with some kind of cooking oil. Just wipe the oil on and out it away. If not the skillet will rust spots.

I think my guru Alton Brown would frown up this approach. His advise and what may have caused the problem is to scrub the pan with Salt and a but of oil that way the "seasoning" is not ruined. If the pan were cleaned this way and not completely wiped out, there may have been a salty residue in the pan...

If I remember correctly scouring will ruin the "non-stick" seasoning created over time. Could be way off and wrong though...

Good stuff. Really appriciate the insight. I knew there was something about iron skillets.
(01-22-2012 10:34 PM)debskis Wrote:  Just a thought: Some brands will inject a seasoned "broth" of sorts under the skin of chicken breast to enhance flavor and moisture, especially when frozen. If this was the case and you didn't realize it, and then added salt, it could have been too much. I've done it myself for sure!

I'll bet you that was it. Thanks Debskis!!!!
The Poll is:

Iron Skillet 2
Sea Salt 2

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01-31-2012, 08:54 PM
Post: #15
RE: Salt or Salty
Hey Debskis. I did the chicken thing again. This time with "No Added Salt" frozen breasts...guess what? No saltiness!!!!!!

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03-31-2012, 10:16 AM (This post was last modified: 03-31-2012 10:18 AM by englea2112.)
Post: #16
RE: Salt or Salty
(01-24-2012 10:02 AM)Counselor Wrote:  
(01-23-2012 05:30 PM)Phillip Wrote:  I use a SOS pad or something similar to clean the skillet. That way you get the bit of pieces off. After you dry the skillet be sure to season the skillet with some kind of cooking oil. Just wipe the oil on and out it away. If not the skillet will rust spots.

I think my guru Alton Brown would frown up this approach. His advise and what may have caused the problem is to scrub the pan with Salt and a but of oil that way the "seasoning" is not ruined. If the pan were cleaned this way and not completely wiped out, there may have been a salty residue in the pan...

If I remember correctly scouring will ruin the "non-stick" seasoning created over time. Could be way off and wrong though...


I have cooked prof. for 15 years and the easyist way to clean ANY pan is pour some distilled viniger and water in the pan and boil for 5-10 min. wash with soap and water. Presto!!
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03-31-2012, 08:45 PM
Post: #17
RE: Salt or Salty
(03-31-2012 10:16 AM)englea2112 Wrote:  
(01-24-2012 10:02 AM)Counselor Wrote:  
(01-23-2012 05:30 PM)Phillip Wrote:  I use a SOS pad or something similar to clean the skillet. That way you get the bit of pieces off. After you dry the skillet be sure to season the skillet with some kind of cooking oil. Just wipe the oil on and out it away. If not the skillet will rust spots.

I think my guru Alton Brown would frown up this approach. His advise and what may have caused the problem is to scrub the pan with Salt and a but of oil that way the "seasoning" is not ruined. If the pan were cleaned this way and not completely wiped out, there may have been a salty residue in the pan...

If I remember correctly scouring will ruin the "non-stick" seasoning created over time. Could be way off and wrong though...


I have cooked prof. for 15 years and the easyist way to clean ANY pan is pour some distilled viniger and water in the pan and boil for 5-10 min. wash with soap and water. Presto!!

Great pointer. I have a couple that could us a good cleaning.

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04-01-2012, 09:08 AM
Post: #18
RE: Salt or Salty
I can hear my grandmothers cringing in horror... *and my own mom probably having flashbacks to the time she washed out an old iron skillet... Not a happy day!

You don't scrub or use soap on a seasoned cast iron skillet. That ruins the seasoning, and makes it not so non-stick.
I've got one that has years-worth of seasoning, and it's the slickest thing ever. Nothing sticks to that ol' beauty. Seasoned by oil and heat, and just gets better the more I use it. Only thing I wish is that I had another few pieces of cast iron... I freakin' love it.

take out whatever you're cooking, scrape remnants/crumbs/bits with a spoon (or whatever you've got handy), add a little more oil, heat it up 'til it's nearly smoking. Pour hot oil into a Pyrex cup (discard when it's cooled off, so as not to melt your trash bag or something, LOL). When the skillet is cooled a little, wipe out with a paper towel.

DONE.

That's how I've been doing for years, and it's perfect.
*one of the few things in my life that is perfect, LOL! Rolleyes Tongue

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