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Sous Vide Cooking
05-23-2012, 06:31 PM
Post: #1
Sous Vide Cooking
Cheers to All, I have been looking into sous-vide cooking for some time, it seems somewhat very technical, does anyone know anything about this cooking style? I can say that the food done with this method is really tender and tasty. Eager to get your responses.
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05-24-2012, 03:26 PM
Post: #2
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
(05-23-2012 06:31 PM)LiveToCook Wrote:  Cheers to All, I have been looking into sous-vide cooking for some time, it seems somewhat very technical, does anyone know anything about this cooking style? I can say that the food done with this method is really tender and tasty. Eager to get your responses.

How odd is that? I took our French exchange student to one of my locals (a tad more expensive and posh compared to the other pubs) and on the menu was something Sous Vide - which was new to me. I was going to ask the student what is meant, but as we had both selected something else it slipped my mind.........

The chef at this restuarant is French......I might ask him what the score is with it...

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05-24-2012, 03:41 PM
Post: #3
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
NWoBHM,

Sous vide cooking is actually food that is vacuum packed in a plastic bags that are a little stronger than just the conservation type. If doing meat, they are packed with spices and whatever condiments and then cooked in water at a constant temperature which is typically below 80 deg C. depending on the type of meat for sometimes as many as 20 hours. Then you can refrigerate or freeze these and then you put it back in water to rewarm at 55 deg C and when ready you pan fry them to brown and put into the oven while dressing up your plates and voilà. What I have had up till now are typically difficult meats to prepare without ruining them like pheasant and other fowls. Tough cuts of beef or others and they come out moist, tasty and probably one phenomenal feature is that they always are the same when pulled from the bag... What I am looking for basically is recipes or procedures for this type of cooking before I invest into equipment that is somewhat expensive. I actually just ordered a book today... not cheap and fairly rare on the open market as this is a technic not accesible to all because of the complexity of it all. Thanks for looking for me and have a good night.
John (LTC)
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05-24-2012, 04:05 PM
Post: #4
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
Quote:Sous vide cooking is actually food that is vacuum packed in a plastic bags

Aha.......I see now LTC.....There has been quite a lot of marketing lately in the UK for cook in the bag meals.......comes with all the spices and herbs etc, you put your meat (seems chicken is the favourite suggestion) seal the bag and into the oven it goes......and cook away. I think I have actually purchased one and it is somewhere in the pantry.

I will give it a go.

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06-15-2012, 09:14 PM
Post: #5
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
Well, I have taken the plunge... My wife says that I most probably hit my head. Which has caused irreversible damages to what I have left for a brain, and a few other words to describe me that cannot be published. I have finally purchased ''the'' tool for doing ''sous-vide cooking''. I spent over 1k on the circulator that is the Sous Vide Professional Chef Series from PolyScience with a few accesories and a lab quality K type thermometer with probe (extra of course). Good thing I already have the vacuum sealer!! All this after spending the past 5-6 months doing research and buying books... Please, not a word to my wife about the books, they are some of the most expensive books that I have ever bought.... Probably as much as the equipment itself. So here goes another adventure in the phenomenal world of cooking. This one has got to be ''the'' ultimate in technical chalenges for me. I have tried a few things in the molecular cuisine world. This was an interesting learning experience other than the fact that it is chemistry in the kitchen a little more complexe than baking. Sous-vide cooking is using temperatures under 100 deg C (212 deg F), I have not seen a recipe yet above 85 C (185 F), so you are not boiling, it becomes more in the line of pasteurization. This is where it gets complicated with meats or any product(s) that is liable to develop bacterias. So time and internal temp's need to be ''dead on''. When you have chefs that tell you they DO NOT want to touch this because of the complexity of it all... Of course others would not live without it. After tasting what can be achieved with this technic, some fantastic meals, here I am!!! I will keep you posted as I progress. If I survive the storm that I created...
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06-16-2012, 01:36 AM
Post: #6
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
Blimey that does sound a little technical, (and pretty expensive too). I am the sort of cook who loves to just slow cook everything - when we had a Rayburn cast iron range cooker I was so happy cooking with that.

Still, this all sounds very interesting. Have you ever heard of a UK celeb chef called Heston Blumanthal? He is a michellin chef (I think), but his TV programmes are one part brilliant chef, one part mad scientist - he does claim he is a frustrated scientist, and he does all sort, cooking (if that is the right word) with liquid oxygen etc

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06-16-2012, 07:06 AM
Post: #7
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
LTC -- Could you post some of the book titles please? I'd love to look at them when I get back. Thanks much!

(06-16-2012 01:36 AM)NWoBHM Wrote:  Blimey that does sound a little technical, (and pretty expensive too). I am the sort of cook who loves to just slow cook everything - when we had a Rayburn cast iron range cooker I was so happy cooking with that.

Still, this all sounds very interesting. Have you ever heard of a UK celeb chef called Heston Blumanthal? He is a michellin chef (I think), but his TV programmes are one part brilliant chef, one part mad scientist - he does claim he is a frustrated scientist, and he does all sort, cooking (if that is the right word) with liquid oxygen etc

Oooooh -- a Rayburn! I'd kill for a Rayburn or an Aga.

I've seen a couple of episodes of Heston's programme where he tries to make "the perfect": the one I remember is fish and chips. The final touch was eau de malt vinegar sprayed on the chips. Smile

(He was also the chef on a reality show I saw a bit of that tried to turn around a restaurant chain on the motorways. Never saw the end, so don't know how it turned out.)

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I'm not one to believe in magic, but I sometimes have a second-sight....
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06-16-2012, 07:45 AM
Post: #8
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
Quote:Oooooh -- a Rayburn! I'd kill for a Rayburn or an Aga.

I know people either hate or love them, but I loved our Rayburn. It did the hot water too, and it was quircky to cook with, which made it all the more fun. I knew, for instance, when doing a Roast if the temperature started to climb, I could ease that off by bathing the girls, which took the hot water out of the system and brought cold water back in. Also it was brilliant for drying baby grows, and just keeping things warm without them drying out. And it used to sort of hum and breath like a living thing through Winter. It was always a sad day to switch it off in Spring, and the best when the Autumn showers came and we re-lit it.


Quote:He was also the chef on a reality show I saw a bit of that tried to turn around a restaurant chain on the motorways

Yes that`s right - I can`t remember which chain but maybe Little Chef? I don`t know how it went in the end, but if it was Little Chef not so good as I think a lot have closed now. Part of the new culture of the UK - In the old days when going on business say to Leeds, (3 hour journey) it was expected you would take a break and have breakfast / lunch / tea or coffee etc as part of the day and claim it on expenses. Not any more!! Work or Walk.

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06-16-2012, 08:52 AM
Post: #9
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
NWoBHM, yes, I know of chef Blumenthal - The Fat Duck Restaurant, the BEST RESTAURANT in the world and the UK at one point...3 star Michelin ect, ect. I would love to eat there at one point. You mentioned liquid oxygen... very interesting. I know of the guys using liquid nitrogen (dry ice) for the molecular cuisine. As for your Rayburn, great choice of tool. But for slow cooking, this ''sous-vide'' technique is the ultimate when you look at some of the recipes... 72 deg C for 36 hours.... You CANNOT be hungry now for what you are doing.
Knitterbookbinder, or can I use KBB, the main books (and best) are; Sous-Vide Cooking by Joan Roca & Salvador Brugués (Spanish chefs), Under Pressure by Thomas Keller (American chef), Modernist Cuisine (6 volume ultra modern cooking reference encyclopedia) and Douglas Baldwin's Practical Sous-Vide Book. Believe me, many many hours of reading and re-reading in these, By the way, if your public library has these... I WILL DO a tantrum (or 2Big Grin), even those being keepers (now) I would have loved to read them before buying. Roca's = 175.00 $can, Keller's 80.00 $can, Modernist set 550.00 $can. Enjoy. By the way what are you doing checking in on the net...aren't you on vacation??? Big GrinRolleyes
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06-16-2012, 09:54 AM
Post: #10
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
Quote:NWoBHM, yes, I know of chef Blumenthal - The Fat Duck Restaurant, the BEST RESTAURANT in the world and the UK at one point

Yes that`s the one LTC, and The Fat Duck is the restuarant. I didn`t know he was a three star chef - wow!!

Quote:I know of the guys using liquid nitrogen (dry ice) for the molecular cuisine

Oooops - Sorry - I think this was what I meant.

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