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Sous Vide Cooking
07-21-2012, 11:57 AM
Post: #31
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
LiveToCook Wrote:Under Pressure by Thomas Keller

You're going to hate me, but our local library actually has a copy of this: I've just ordered it to be delivered over to my neighbourhood library. Cool

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07-21-2012, 02:49 PM
Post: #32
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
I'm not hating you... I am just jealous. But seriously, let me know what you think of it. I like it a lot, it is very well done other than the technical aspects that are not covered enough.
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07-29-2012, 07:27 AM
Post: #33
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
(07-21-2012 02:49 PM)LiveToCook Wrote:  But seriously, let me know what you think of it. I like it a lot, it is very well done other than the technical aspects that are not covered enough.

Wow! Keller's cookbook is just amazing, isn't it? The pictures are just stunning -- talk about food porn. Big Grin

I'm not about to shell out all the money for the specialized equipment, but I'd sure try to adapt some of them to take advantage of the small vacuum sealer I have. And some of the various parts are stove-top cooking, and definitely worth doing, like the tomato marmalade on page 80.

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07-29-2012, 08:55 PM
Post: #34
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
Nice book, I do agree and some of the recipes are excellent, some I have not had the time to try yet... Always short on time!
Angry ...Where does it all go! Quail in a jar (p.130) is one I am going to try... some of the desserts and of course liking to work with duck, there are a few that seem interesting. Right now, I have been spending a fair bit of time with Joan Roca's ''Sous-Vide''. It is way more technical for the learning process and of course some of the recipes are phenomenal, cannot wait to try them. So, if you are interested in learning some of the do's and don't's and with the library system you have, give this one (Joan Roca's & Salvador Brugues' Sous-Vide Cuisine) a try. And yes, it is possible to do some sous-vide with very little equipment. I will dig a few articles out and I will pass them on.
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08-26-2015, 03:30 PM
Post: #35
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
Well mon ami...I've finally taken the plunge. Actually, it's probably more like sticking a toe in the water as the pricing of immersion circulators has come down significantly since I last checked 3yrs ago.

http://anovaculinary.com/anova-precision-cooker/


This is gonna be FUN!Smile

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08-27-2015, 07:19 AM
Post: #36
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
Oh!!! Mon ami, this is a different dimension of cooking and of course with pricing being now very attractive... Yes, you are most definitely going to have fun. I also noticed that there are many publications on the subject. As to when I started, I had to do my research from nothing and a lot of trials and errors. This was, for everyone (pro chefs) were being secretive about the subject to keep an edge over their competition. It has come a long way in a very short period of time. As of lately, I have been using this method to do wild game and I must admit that some of these recipes are out of this world. Just wish I had more time to spend doing exploration in the kitchen these days... Basically, it has been using the acquired knowledge these days and fighting the ''ultra-conservatives'' in my surroundings. This either under my roof and circle of friends, that are expecting the same recipes all the time... They let me know when I deviate from my so-called established and great recipes. But enough of my sobbing, YOU WILL have fun and I am sure, make discoveries of your own and also what ''xyz'' chefs have been doing to achieve an edge in their kitchens. Keep me posted!!
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08-27-2015, 09:41 AM
Post: #37
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
(08-27-2015 07:19 AM)LiveToCook Wrote:  fighting the ''ultra-conservatives'' in my surroundings. This either under my roof and circle of friends, that are expecting the same recipes all the time...


It seems that once again we have something in common lol! My purchase announcement was greeted with derision and comments like "gimmick" and "superfluous gadgetry". I didn't bother to explain that an immersion circulator isn't a "gadget", rather a tool utilized in an entirely different methodology. Maybe I'll let the offender have a bite of my fork tender pork loin in calvados/chantrelle cream sauce in order to highlight the error of her thought process. Or maybe not!Big Grin

Regardless I'll be sure to post my successes(and failures) right here...

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08-27-2015, 01:53 PM (This post was last modified: 08-27-2015 01:58 PM by LiveToCook.)
Post: #38
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
I have made some wonderful porc dishes in this style that were certainly good enough to be on the tables of the top restaurants in the world... All with a ''true'' taste of porc and the beauty to sous-vide cooking is you do not lose any of the taste(s), odor(s), moisture(s) and tenderness is certainly not lost to overcooking. So, some of the detractors, should maybe consider this fashion as they are the usual culprits of overcooking their meats, it would probably teach them that yes, there is a maximum limit to cooking meats just like a minimum!!!
Oooooh, those conservatives(...)!!!! Big Grin
>>tender pork loin in calvados/chantrelle cream sauce<<
Nowwww, you are talking my language when it comes to sauce(s), another notch for you on the respect scale...
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08-27-2015, 02:12 PM
Post: #39
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
Merci!

Just received the tracking info for delivery of the circulator and I'll have it in a couple days at most. This time of year is crunch time for me. 12-14hr days 7 days a week, so it might be a little while before I post a dish(or a disaster lol). But stay tuned, I'll have something to post soon enough...

I've been pouring over recipes on-line and I can't wait.Smile

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08-30-2015, 08:44 PM
Post: #40
RE: Sous Vide Cooking
French for "under vacuum" is a method of cooking in which food is sealed in airtight plastic bags then placed in a water bath or in a temperature-controlled steam environment for longer than normal cooking times—96 hours or more, in some cases—at an accurately regulated temperature much lower than normally used for cooking, typically around 55 °C (131 °F) to 60 °C (140 °F) for meat and higher for vegetables. The intent is to cook the item evenly, ensuring that the inside is properly cooked without overcooking the outside, and retain moisture.

I sous vide chicken and it turned pink/white. It looked under-cooked but it was cooked.

Safety

Food safety is a function of both time and temperature; a temperature usually considered insufficient to render food safe may be perfectly safe if maintained for long enough. Some sous-vide fish recipes, for example, are cooked below 55 °C (131 °F). However, pasteurization of the food to be eaten by people with compromised immunity is highly desirable. Women eating food cooked sous-vide while pregnant may expose risk to themselves and/or their fetus and thus may choose to avoid unpasteurized recipes.[5]

Clostridium botulinum bacteria can grow in food in the absence of oxygen and produce the deadly botulinum toxin, so sous-vide cooking must be performed under carefully controlled conditions to avoid botulism poisoning.[7] Generally speaking, food that is heated and served within four hours is considered safe, but meat that is cooked for longer to tenderize must reach a temperature of at least 55 °C (131 °F) within four hours and then be kept there for sufficient time, in order to pasteurize the meat.

Pasteurization kills the botulism bacteria, but the possibility of hardy botulism spores surviving and reactivating once cool remains a concern as with many preserved foods, however processed. For that reason, Baldwin's treatise specifies precise chilling requirements for "cook-chill", so that the botulism spores do not have the opportunity to grow or propagate. Pasteurised food can then be stored for up to two weeks at around 3 °C (37 °F) sealed within the vacuum pack.[5]

The plastic used must not leach endocrine disruptors. Many plasticizers used in plastics have these properties.[8][9]

So if you want to sous vide hamburgers and hot dogs for example the night before, you cook sous vide the burgers and dogs, place it in a zip-lock-type bag, put the bag in the room temp water, allow the water to push the air out, seal the bag, set the temperature to 140F, allow it to sous vide for 4 to 8 hours and it is done.

But, to prevent botulism, make sure that you have an ice bath: (Bucket full of ice-cold water) drop the package in, and allow the hot dog and burger to drop in temp for 4 hours, then, remove the bag, air-tight and all, and throw it in the freezer.

When it's time to cook, sous vide the the frozen meal until the food is defrosted, then allow the meat to go back up to 140 F. You cannot overcook Sous vide. IF you want your food to caramelize, then use the grill to brown the meat.

This is what I use: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC20Oenv...avenUpoTvA
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